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Impact of fatty acids on CNS autoimmunity and their therapeutic potential for multiple sclerosis
Author(s): ,
A. Haghikia
Affiliations:
Department of Neurology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum
,
A. Duscha
Affiliations:
Department of Neurology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum
,
S. Jörg
Affiliations:
Department of Neurology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany
,
J. Berg
Affiliations:
Department of Neurology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum
,
R.A. Linker
Affiliations:
Department of Neurology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany
R. Gold
Affiliations:
Department of Neurology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum
ECTRIMS Online Library. Haghikia A. Oct 10, 2015; 116695
Aiden Haghikia
Aiden Haghikia
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Abstract: 230

Type: Oral LB

Abstract Category: Invited / Oral LB / Poster LB

Objecive: To investigate the impact of short chain fatty acids (SCFA), specifically propionate (PA) on differentiation of regualatory T cells (Treg) in vivo in human healthy volunteers.

Background: We have shown the effect of fatty acids with different chain lengths on differential T cell differentiation ex vivo and in vivo in the small intestine in an MOG induced experimental model of multiple sclerosis, the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Herein, we could show that while long chain FA have a detrimental effect on the course of disease, SCFA ameliorate EAE mainly by promoting the differentiation of Treg in the gut lamina propria.

Design and methods: In a translational study we transferred our observations on SCFA in the EAE to the human situation by administrating PA (1g daily) in capsules for 14-60 days to volunteers (n=18) - including washout intervals after 14 days. A detailed immunophenotypic assessment of T cell subsets before and at several time points after PA intake was performed, as well as additional functional correlates, such as suppression assays including Treg of PA treated individuals and cytokine measurements.

Results: We report the first in vivo effect of PA in humans. PA intake was tolerated well by all volunteers and no side effects occurred. Treg in all treated individuals increased (up to 25-30%), which was accompanied by a significant decrease of Th17 cels.

Conclusions: Our results underline the influence of nutrition on systemic immune answer und may have synergistic effect with established disease modifying drugs for autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis.

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose

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