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Fluoxetine in progressive multiple sclerosis (FLUOX-PMS)
Author(s): ,
M Cambron
Affiliations:
University Hospital Brussels, Brussels, Belgium
,
J Mostert
Affiliations:
Rijnstate Hospital, Arnhem, The Netherlands
,
J Parra
Affiliations:
UMCOM, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels
,
M D'hooghe
Affiliations:
National MS Center Melsbroek, Melsbroek
,
G Nagels
Affiliations:
National MS Center Melsbroek, Melsbroek
,
B Willekens
Affiliations:
Antwerp University Hospital, Antwerp, Belgium
,
D Heersema
Affiliations:
University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
,
J Debruyne
Affiliations:
University Hospital Ghent, Ghent
,
W Van Hecke
Affiliations:
Icometrix, Leuven
,
L Algoed
Affiliations:
AZ Marie Middelares Ghent, Ghent
,
N De Klippel
Affiliations:
University Hospital Brussels, Brussels, Belgium0
,
E Fosselle
Affiliations:
University Hospital Brussels, Brussels, BelgiumUniversity Hospital Brussels, Brussels, Belgium
,
G Laureys
Affiliations:
University Hospital Brussels, Brussels, BelgiumRijnstate Hospital, Arnhem, The Netherlands
,
H Merckx
Affiliations:
University Hospital Brussels, Brussels, BelgiumUMCOM, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels
,
B Van Wijmeersch
Affiliations:
University Hospital Brussels, Brussels, BelgiumNational MS Center Melsbroek, Melsbroek
,
L Vanopdenbosch
Affiliations:
University Hospital Brussels, Brussels, BelgiumAntwerp University Hospital, Antwerp, Belgium
,
W Verhaegen
Affiliations:
University Hospital Brussels, Brussels, BelgiumUniversity Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
,
R Hupperts
Affiliations:
University Hospital Brussels, Brussels, BelgiumUniversity Hospital Ghent, Ghent
,
G Hengstman
Affiliations:
University Hospital Brussels, Brussels, BelgiumIcometrix, Leuven
,
V Michiels
Affiliations:
University Hospital Brussels, Brussels, Belgium
,
A Van Merhaegen - Wieleman
Affiliations:
University Hospital Brussels, Brussels, Belgium
J De Keyser
Affiliations:
University Hospital Brussels, Brussels, Belgium;University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
ECTRIMS Online Library. Cambron M. Sep 16, 2016; 147080
Melissa Cambron
Melissa Cambron
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Abstract: 253

Type: LB Oral

Abstract Category: Late Breaking News

Background: The progressive phase of multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by a widespread axonal degeneration, which leads to a substantial disability in patients and up-to-date the currently available disease-modifying treatments fail to stop this degenerative process. Since these immunomodulatory treatments do not seem to slow down this process, we suspect that a reduced axonal energy metabolism, axonal glutamate toxicity and reduced cerebral blood flow are involved in this widespread axonal degeneration. Fluoxetine has shown to have neuroprotective features and might theoretically reduce axonal degeneration through stimulation of the energy metabolism by enhancing glycogenolysis, increasing the production of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor, and dilating cerebral arterioles. This clinical trial aims to test the hypothesis that fluoxetine slows down the progressive phase of MS.

Methods/design: The FLUOX-PMS trial is a multi-center, randomized, controlled and double-blind clinical study. Hundred and thirty-four patients with the diagnosis of either secondary or primary progressive MS were treated either by fluoxetine (40 mg daily) or placebo for a total period of 108 weeks. The primary endpoint was the time to confirmed disease progression defined as either at least a 20 % increase in the timed 25-Foot Walk or at least a 20 % increase in the 9-Hole Peg Test. Trial Registration Eudra-CT: 2011-003775-11.

Results: Overall 180 patients were screened of whom 134 were randomized to fluoxetine or placebo. Mean age at baseline was 53 years. In total 47,2% of the included patients were female, 24,8% were on classic disease modifying treatment for MS. 38,5% of the patients were diagnosed with a primary progressive form of MS.

Discussion: The results of the FLUOX-PMS trial will allow us to assess whether fluoxetine has neuroprotective effects in patients with progressive MS. The results will be presented after all the patients have finished the trial, which is expected by the end of July 2016.

Disclosure:

Melissa Cambron: nothing to disclose

Jop Mostert: nothing to disclose

Jose Parra: nothing to disclose

Marie D"Hooghe: nothing to disclose

Guy Nagels: nothing to disclose

Barbara Willekens: nothing to disclose

Dorothea Heersema: nothing to disclose

Jan Debruyne: nothing to disclose

Wim Van Hecke: nothing to disclose

Luc Algoed: nothing to disclose

Nina De Klippel: nothing to disclose

Erwin Fosselle: nothing to disclose

Guy Laureys: nothing to disclose

Henri Merckx: nothing to disclose

Bart Van Wijmeersch: nothing to disclose

Ludo Vanopdenbosch: nothing to disclose

Wim Verhaegen: nothing to disclose

Raymond Hupperts: nothing to disclose

Gerald Hengstman: nothing to disclose

Veronique Michiels: nothing to disclose

Annick Van Merhaegen-Wieleman: nothing to disclose

Jacques De Keyser: nothing to disclose

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