ECTRIMS Online Library

Neurofeedback as cognitive training tool in multiple sclerosis - a first exploratory study
Author(s): ,
S.E Kober
Affiliations:
Department of Psychology, University of Graz, Austria;BioTechMed-Graz
,
D Pinter
Affiliations:
Department of Neurology
,
S Fuchs
Affiliations:
Department of Neurology
,
C Neuper
Affiliations:
Department of Psychology, University of Graz, Austria;BioTechMed-Graz
,
F Fazekas
Affiliations:
Department of Neurology
,
C Enzinger
Affiliations:
BioTechMed-Graz;Department of Neurology;Division of Neuroradiology/Vascular and Interventional Radiology/Department of Radiology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
G Wood
Affiliations:
Department of Psychology, University of Graz, Austria;BioTechMed-Graz
ECTRIMS Online Library. Kober S. 09/14/16; 145654; EP1559
Silvia E. Kober
Silvia E. Kober
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: EP1559

Type: ePoster

Abstract Category: Therapy - symptomatic - Treatment of specific symptoms

Aim of this study is to provide first data on potential effects of neurofeedback (NF) on cognitive functions and their electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlates in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). NF is a kind of biofeedback where subjects can learn to voluntarily modulate their own brain activation. Hence, NF might be an alternative training method to target cognitive functioning directly where it emerges in the brain.

For this first exploratory investigation, 20 patients with relapsing-remitting or secondary progressive MS between 18-60 years, suffering from cognitive deficits, are planned to be included, along with a waiting list control group (N=10). Exclusion criteria are dementia, psychiatric disorders or other concomitant neurological disorders. Patients perform ten sessions of EEG based NF training at home, in which they shall increase their sensorimotor rhythm (SMR, 12-15 Hz) in the EEG, while getting audio-visual feedback. To assess cognitive functions before and after NF training (pre-post design), we use the Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Tests (BRB-N). Possible functional and structural changes in the brain due to NF are assessed with multi-channel EEG and multimodal MRI at 3 Tesla.

At time of submission, data from 7 patients who completed the training and pre-post assessments are available. Four patients successfully increased their SMR activity during training. These NF responders significantly improved cognitively, especially in memory and executive functions. Their average T-score of 45.13 in the subscale long-term memory significantly increased to an average T-score of 52.48 after training. Executive functions developed in the same direction, with a below average T-score of 38.58 before training to an average T-score of 49.40 after training. Three patients were not able to voluntarily modulate their own brain activity in the desired direction during training. No changes in cognitive functions were noted in these non-responders.

First results of this ongoing comprehensive study aiming to improve cognitive function in MS by NF training from a small sample are promising, yet indicate a substantial number of non-responders. Completion of the study by all patients (including the waiting list group) is expected for the time of the congress. Together with the analyses of EEG and MRI data, this should allow to better understand the correlates and heterogeneity of training response.

Disclosure: Silvia Erika Kober: nothing to disclose.

Daniela Pinter: nothing to disclose.

Siegrid Fuchs: nothing to disclose.

Christa Neuper: nothing to disclose.

Franz Fazekas: nothing to disclose.

Christian Enzinger: nothing to disclose.

Guilherme Wood: nothing to disclose.



Source of funding: BioTechMed-Graz, Graz, Austria

Abstract: EP1559

Type: ePoster

Abstract Category: Therapy - symptomatic - Treatment of specific symptoms

Aim of this study is to provide first data on potential effects of neurofeedback (NF) on cognitive functions and their electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlates in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). NF is a kind of biofeedback where subjects can learn to voluntarily modulate their own brain activation. Hence, NF might be an alternative training method to target cognitive functioning directly where it emerges in the brain.

For this first exploratory investigation, 20 patients with relapsing-remitting or secondary progressive MS between 18-60 years, suffering from cognitive deficits, are planned to be included, along with a waiting list control group (N=10). Exclusion criteria are dementia, psychiatric disorders or other concomitant neurological disorders. Patients perform ten sessions of EEG based NF training at home, in which they shall increase their sensorimotor rhythm (SMR, 12-15 Hz) in the EEG, while getting audio-visual feedback. To assess cognitive functions before and after NF training (pre-post design), we use the Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Tests (BRB-N). Possible functional and structural changes in the brain due to NF are assessed with multi-channel EEG and multimodal MRI at 3 Tesla.

At time of submission, data from 7 patients who completed the training and pre-post assessments are available. Four patients successfully increased their SMR activity during training. These NF responders significantly improved cognitively, especially in memory and executive functions. Their average T-score of 45.13 in the subscale long-term memory significantly increased to an average T-score of 52.48 after training. Executive functions developed in the same direction, with a below average T-score of 38.58 before training to an average T-score of 49.40 after training. Three patients were not able to voluntarily modulate their own brain activity in the desired direction during training. No changes in cognitive functions were noted in these non-responders.

First results of this ongoing comprehensive study aiming to improve cognitive function in MS by NF training from a small sample are promising, yet indicate a substantial number of non-responders. Completion of the study by all patients (including the waiting list group) is expected for the time of the congress. Together with the analyses of EEG and MRI data, this should allow to better understand the correlates and heterogeneity of training response.

Disclosure: Silvia Erika Kober: nothing to disclose.

Daniela Pinter: nothing to disclose.

Siegrid Fuchs: nothing to disclose.

Christa Neuper: nothing to disclose.

Franz Fazekas: nothing to disclose.

Christian Enzinger: nothing to disclose.

Guilherme Wood: nothing to disclose.



Source of funding: BioTechMed-Graz, Graz, Austria

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies