The effect of high flavonoid cocoa on fatigue in people with multiple sclerosis
Author(s):
S. Coe
,
S. Coe
Affiliations:
E. Axelsson
,
E. Axelsson
Affiliations:
V. Murphy
,
V. Murphy
Affiliations:
J. Collett
,
J. Collett
Affiliations:
M. Clegg
,
M. Clegg
Affiliations:
H. Izadi
,
H. Izadi
Affiliations:
H. Dawes
H. Dawes
Affiliations:
ECTRIMS Online Library. Coe S. 09/14/16; 145675; EP1580
Shelly Coe
Shelly Coe
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: EP1580

Type: ePoster

Abstract Category: RIMS - Symptoms Management

Background: Emerging evidence suggests that pure cocoa which is rich in flavonoids may reduce fatigue; however, this effect in MS has not been investigated. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of the acute effect of high flavonoid cocoa on measures of fatigue in people with MS.

Methods: This was a randomised crossover exposure response patient blind exploratory study in 12 participants with MS-related fatigue. In a random order participants consumed the high flavonoid cocoa drink (350 mg gallic acid equivalents {GAE}/g) or a low flavonoid cocoa control (120 mg GAE/g), consuming the alternative drink on the next visit. Fatigue was self-reported on a 10cm visual analogue scale at 30-minute time intervals for 2 hours post cocoa consumption and every 2 hours for the rest of the day. A 6MWT was performed at the end of the visit (2 hrs) as a measure of endurance, and activity monitors were worn for 24 hours commencing at 12pm on the day of testing.

Results: A moderate effect was found in self-reported fatigue throughout the day in favour of the high flavonoid group post consumption (Cohen"s d 0.32, 95% non-central t CI -0.57-1.20). Although there were emerging trends, there was no significant difference in activity between the two groups. No effect was observed in the performance on the 6MWT.

Conclusion: The results of this study are encouraging and support further trials to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of pure cocoa as a dietary supplement for fatigue in MS.

Disclosure: Funding: Coe is funded by the Multiple Sclerosis Society, Collett is funded by Health Education Thames Valley, and Dawes is funded by Elizabeth Casson Trust.

There is no conflict of interest.

Abstract: EP1580

Type: ePoster

Abstract Category: RIMS - Symptoms Management

Background: Emerging evidence suggests that pure cocoa which is rich in flavonoids may reduce fatigue; however, this effect in MS has not been investigated. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of the acute effect of high flavonoid cocoa on measures of fatigue in people with MS.

Methods: This was a randomised crossover exposure response patient blind exploratory study in 12 participants with MS-related fatigue. In a random order participants consumed the high flavonoid cocoa drink (350 mg gallic acid equivalents {GAE}/g) or a low flavonoid cocoa control (120 mg GAE/g), consuming the alternative drink on the next visit. Fatigue was self-reported on a 10cm visual analogue scale at 30-minute time intervals for 2 hours post cocoa consumption and every 2 hours for the rest of the day. A 6MWT was performed at the end of the visit (2 hrs) as a measure of endurance, and activity monitors were worn for 24 hours commencing at 12pm on the day of testing.

Results: A moderate effect was found in self-reported fatigue throughout the day in favour of the high flavonoid group post consumption (Cohen"s d 0.32, 95% non-central t CI -0.57-1.20). Although there were emerging trends, there was no significant difference in activity between the two groups. No effect was observed in the performance on the 6MWT.

Conclusion: The results of this study are encouraging and support further trials to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of pure cocoa as a dietary supplement for fatigue in MS.

Disclosure: Funding: Coe is funded by the Multiple Sclerosis Society, Collett is funded by Health Education Thames Valley, and Dawes is funded by Elizabeth Casson Trust.

There is no conflict of interest.

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