Intestinal microbiota in multiple sclerosis: influence of treatment with interferon β-1b
Author(s): ,
F Castillo Álvarez
Affiliations:
Neurology, Hospital San Pedro
,
P Pérez Matute
Affiliations:
CIBIR (Centro de Investigación Biomédica de La Rioja), Logroño, Spain
,
S Colina Lizuain
Affiliations:
Neurology, Hospital San Pedro
,
A Erdocia Goñi
Affiliations:
Neurology, Hospital San Pedro
,
C Iglesias Gutiérrez Cecchini
Affiliations:
Neurology, Hospital San Pedro
,
M Gómez Eguilaz
Affiliations:
Neurology, Hospital San Pedro
,
M.Á López Pérez
Affiliations:
Neurology, Hospital San Pedro
E Marzo Sola
Affiliations:
Neurology, Hospital San Pedro
ECTRIMS Online Library. Castillo Álvarez F. 09/15/16; 146290; P450
Federico Castillo Álvarez
Federico Castillo Álvarez
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: P450

Type: Poster

Abstract Category: Pathology and pathogenesis of MS - Environmental risk factors

Objectives: Describe and compare the relative composition in bacterial taxa and archaea of the gut microbiota between patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) untreated and treated with interferon β-1b compared with healthy controls, in terms of phyla and more frequent taxa.

Background: The gut microbiota plays an important role in the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis; however, its role in MS is not yet defined.

Design and methods: Single centre descriptive study. Participants included 30 MS patients (half of whom had been treated with interferon β-1b for at least 9 months) and 14 otherwise healthy controls. A metagenomic study of faecal microbiota was conducted in stool samples collected for all the participants.

Results: The most common phyla across all 3 study groups included Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria.

The differences relating to the abundance of Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Lentisphaerae between patients, untreated and treated with interferon β-1b, and controls were found to be statistically significant.

Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Lentisphaerae differed between untreated MS patients, who tend to rebalance their microbiota after treatment, and controls.

The differences between MS patients and controls regarding bacterial abundance for 12 different species, including Prevotella copri DSM 18205, were found to be statistically significant; following treatment with interferon β-1b, these bacteria tend to achieve similar levels to those found in healthy subjects.

Patients with MS showed lower abundance of Archaea than healthy controls.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the gut microbiota is significantly altered in patients suffering from MS compared to healthy subjects.

Interferon β-1b tends to be effective at rebalancing the gut microbiota of patients affected with this condition, being this particularly evident for Prevotella copri. DSM 18205

These preliminary results support the need for further studies on the potential role of microbial dysbiosis for preventing and treating MS.

Disclosure:

Federico Castillo-Álvarez: nothing to disclose

Patricia Pérez Matute: nothing to disclose

Sandra Colina Lizuain: nothing to disclose

Amaia Erdocia Goñi: nothing to disclose

Carmen Iglesias Gutiérrez Cecchini: nothing to disclose

Eugenia Marzo Sola: nothing to disclose

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies