Dietary habits, nutritional status and risk of a diagnosis of a first demyelinating event: a single center incident case-control study
ECTRIMS Online Library. CAVALLA P. 10/27/17; 200658; P1003
PAOLA CAVALLA
PAOLA CAVALLA
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: P1003

Type: Poster

Abstract Category: Pathology and pathogenesis of MS - 17 Environmental factors

The link between dietary habits and the pathogenesis of MS is still under debate. Dietary habits can influence inflammatory pathways and composition of gut microbiota.
Aim of this study was to assess the predominant dietary habits and nutritional status in MS/CIS patients at the time of the first demyelinating event compared to healthy controls, in order to examine the association between diet and risk of a diagnosis of a first demyelinating event. Dietary data were collected, under supervision by a registered dietitian, with 7-days food recall, food frequency questionnaire and 24-hours food recall. Anthropometric evaluation and blood tests for nutritional status were performed. All consecutive new incident cases of first demyelinating event observed in our center over 18 months were included. Age- and sex-matched controls were recruited from healthy volunteers.
Sixty patients with a first demyelinating event and a similar number of age- and sex-matched controls were recruited. In patients with a first demyelinating event, a significantly lower dietary intake was observed for vitamin D (1.45vs7.81ug,p< 0.001), folic acid (112.91vs323.11ug,p< 0.001), cellulose (1.53vs3.60g,p< 0.001), vitamin B6 (0.82vs1.28mg,p< 0.001), vegetal proteins (33.64vs44.70%,p< 0.001); a higher intake was observed for rapid absorption carbohydrates (19.30vs11.97g,p< 0.001), animal proteins (65.81vs54.82%,p< 0.001). The ratio of dietary omega6/omega3 and MUFA/PUFA was higher in patients with a first demyelinating event than in controls (omega6/omega 3 8.60vs6.35,p< 0.001; MUFA/PUFA 4.80vs3.80,p< 0.001).
In a conditional logistic regression model, low vitamin D intake, high intake of rapid absorption carbohydrates and high omega6/omega3 ratio were all independently associated with a risk of diagnosis of first demyelinating event.
These results show significant differences in the dietary habits at the time of the first demyelinating event between patients and controls. Some of these are known risk factors for MS, such as low vitamin D and low PUFA intake. Some others, such as high intake of rapid absorption carbohydrates and high omega6/omega3 ratio, have been proposed to be generally pro-inflammatory but their role in MS remains to be confirmed.
Furthermore, these results show a high prevalence of unhealthy dietary habits (correlated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease) in MS patients at the time of disease onset and suggest the need for a dietitian consultation in MS clinics.
Disclosure:
P Cavalla: has received consulting honoraria and/or speaker fees from Almirall, Biogen, Genzyme, Teva, Novartis and Merck-Serono.
Marco Vercellino: has received consulting honoraria and/or speaker fees from Biogen, Genzyme and Merck-Serono.
Paola Durelli: nothing to disclose
Daniela Maietta: nothing to disclose
Paola Golzio: nothing to disclose
Gianfranco Costantini: nothing to disclose
Antonella De Francesco: nothing to disclose
Maria Teresa Giordana: nothing to disclose

Abstract: P1003

Type: Poster

Abstract Category: Pathology and pathogenesis of MS - 17 Environmental factors

The link between dietary habits and the pathogenesis of MS is still under debate. Dietary habits can influence inflammatory pathways and composition of gut microbiota.
Aim of this study was to assess the predominant dietary habits and nutritional status in MS/CIS patients at the time of the first demyelinating event compared to healthy controls, in order to examine the association between diet and risk of a diagnosis of a first demyelinating event. Dietary data were collected, under supervision by a registered dietitian, with 7-days food recall, food frequency questionnaire and 24-hours food recall. Anthropometric evaluation and blood tests for nutritional status were performed. All consecutive new incident cases of first demyelinating event observed in our center over 18 months were included. Age- and sex-matched controls were recruited from healthy volunteers.
Sixty patients with a first demyelinating event and a similar number of age- and sex-matched controls were recruited. In patients with a first demyelinating event, a significantly lower dietary intake was observed for vitamin D (1.45vs7.81ug,p< 0.001), folic acid (112.91vs323.11ug,p< 0.001), cellulose (1.53vs3.60g,p< 0.001), vitamin B6 (0.82vs1.28mg,p< 0.001), vegetal proteins (33.64vs44.70%,p< 0.001); a higher intake was observed for rapid absorption carbohydrates (19.30vs11.97g,p< 0.001), animal proteins (65.81vs54.82%,p< 0.001). The ratio of dietary omega6/omega3 and MUFA/PUFA was higher in patients with a first demyelinating event than in controls (omega6/omega 3 8.60vs6.35,p< 0.001; MUFA/PUFA 4.80vs3.80,p< 0.001).
In a conditional logistic regression model, low vitamin D intake, high intake of rapid absorption carbohydrates and high omega6/omega3 ratio were all independently associated with a risk of diagnosis of first demyelinating event.
These results show significant differences in the dietary habits at the time of the first demyelinating event between patients and controls. Some of these are known risk factors for MS, such as low vitamin D and low PUFA intake. Some others, such as high intake of rapid absorption carbohydrates and high omega6/omega3 ratio, have been proposed to be generally pro-inflammatory but their role in MS remains to be confirmed.
Furthermore, these results show a high prevalence of unhealthy dietary habits (correlated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease) in MS patients at the time of disease onset and suggest the need for a dietitian consultation in MS clinics.
Disclosure:
P Cavalla: has received consulting honoraria and/or speaker fees from Almirall, Biogen, Genzyme, Teva, Novartis and Merck-Serono.
Marco Vercellino: has received consulting honoraria and/or speaker fees from Biogen, Genzyme and Merck-Serono.
Paola Durelli: nothing to disclose
Daniela Maietta: nothing to disclose
Paola Golzio: nothing to disclose
Gianfranco Costantini: nothing to disclose
Antonella De Francesco: nothing to disclose
Maria Teresa Giordana: nothing to disclose

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