Environmental and genetic factors in MS susceptibility in Spain
ECTRIMS Online Library. Pinto-Medel M. 10/27/17; 200660; P1005
María Jesús Pinto-Medel
María Jesús Pinto-Medel
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: P1005

Type: Poster

Abstract Category: Pathology and pathogenesis of MS - 17 Environmental factors

Background: The etiology of MS is still unclear, but it is believed that a combination of genetic and environmental factors contribute to this disease. Over 100 genetic loci have been implicated in susceptibility to MS in European populations, being the most prominent the 15:01 allele of the HLA-DRB1 gene. Other environmental risk factors such as vitamin D deficiency or cigarette smoking contribute to MS susceptibility
Aim: To analyze the relationship of the presence of the allele HLA-DRB1*15:01, vitamin D deficiency and cigarette smoking with MS susceptibility in three independent cohorts from Spain.
Methods: This study included 149 MS patients, and 149 healthy controls sex and age-matched.
HLA-DRB1*15:01 allele was identified using sequence-specific primers based on the PCR-SSP method. Smoking status was determined by a survey done at the time of sample collection. Levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D in serum above 20ng/ml were considered as normal.
The strength of association between variables was measured by calculating the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals by logistic regression. The multivariate logistic regression model was controlled for potential confounders such as age and gender.
Results: We have found that presence of HLA-DRB1*15:01 allele, smoking and vitamin D deficiency were significantly associated with the risk of MS (OR=2.60 (IC95%: 1.32-5.10); p=0.006, OR=10.22 (IC95%: 5.75-18.17); p=2.30x10-15 and OR=3.60 (IC95%: 1.77-7.34); p=4.26x10-4 respectively).
Conclusions: Our study has shown that the presence of HLA-DRB1*15:01 allele, smoking and vitamin D deficiency were associated with a higher risk of MS. According to our model, smoking represents the highest risk for MS. And this risk increases significantly when there is also a deficiency of vitamin D.
Disclosure:
A. HERNANDEZ has collaborated in different activities with Lab Merck, Novartis, Genzyme-sanofi, Teva and Roche.
C. Oreja has received honoraria from Biogen, Sanofi-Genzyme, Bayer, Novartis, Teva, and Merck-Serono.
O. Fernandez reports receiving honoraria as a consultant in advisory boards, as chair/lecturer in meetings, from participation in clinical trials and other research projects promoted by Actelion, Allergan, Almirall, Bayer-Schering, Biogen, Merck Serono, Novartis, Sanofi Genzyme, and Teva, and research support from the Hospital Foundation FIMABIS; he also serves as editor of the Revista Española de Esclerosis Múltiple.
The other authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Abstract: P1005

Type: Poster

Abstract Category: Pathology and pathogenesis of MS - 17 Environmental factors

Background: The etiology of MS is still unclear, but it is believed that a combination of genetic and environmental factors contribute to this disease. Over 100 genetic loci have been implicated in susceptibility to MS in European populations, being the most prominent the 15:01 allele of the HLA-DRB1 gene. Other environmental risk factors such as vitamin D deficiency or cigarette smoking contribute to MS susceptibility
Aim: To analyze the relationship of the presence of the allele HLA-DRB1*15:01, vitamin D deficiency and cigarette smoking with MS susceptibility in three independent cohorts from Spain.
Methods: This study included 149 MS patients, and 149 healthy controls sex and age-matched.
HLA-DRB1*15:01 allele was identified using sequence-specific primers based on the PCR-SSP method. Smoking status was determined by a survey done at the time of sample collection. Levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D in serum above 20ng/ml were considered as normal.
The strength of association between variables was measured by calculating the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals by logistic regression. The multivariate logistic regression model was controlled for potential confounders such as age and gender.
Results: We have found that presence of HLA-DRB1*15:01 allele, smoking and vitamin D deficiency were significantly associated with the risk of MS (OR=2.60 (IC95%: 1.32-5.10); p=0.006, OR=10.22 (IC95%: 5.75-18.17); p=2.30x10-15 and OR=3.60 (IC95%: 1.77-7.34); p=4.26x10-4 respectively).
Conclusions: Our study has shown that the presence of HLA-DRB1*15:01 allele, smoking and vitamin D deficiency were associated with a higher risk of MS. According to our model, smoking represents the highest risk for MS. And this risk increases significantly when there is also a deficiency of vitamin D.
Disclosure:
A. HERNANDEZ has collaborated in different activities with Lab Merck, Novartis, Genzyme-sanofi, Teva and Roche.
C. Oreja has received honoraria from Biogen, Sanofi-Genzyme, Bayer, Novartis, Teva, and Merck-Serono.
O. Fernandez reports receiving honoraria as a consultant in advisory boards, as chair/lecturer in meetings, from participation in clinical trials and other research projects promoted by Actelion, Allergan, Almirall, Bayer-Schering, Biogen, Merck Serono, Novartis, Sanofi Genzyme, and Teva, and research support from the Hospital Foundation FIMABIS; he also serves as editor of the Revista Española de Esclerosis Múltiple.
The other authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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