Can brain stimulation influence repair in MS?
ECTRIMS Online Library. Leocani L. 10/26/17; 202515; 159
Letizia Leocani
Letizia Leocani
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: 159

Type: Oral

Non-invasive brain stimulation-NIBS techniques are widely applied to sevral neurological diseases evaluation and treatment. Repeated NIBS sessions are able to modulate neuronal activity over stimulation period facilitating neuroplasticity. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has already been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat major depression that has not responded to drugs. More recently, both this and other NIBS techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), have been applied to improve sensory or motor symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), such as chronic pain or walking impairment. Promising results have been observed after the application of NIBS as isolated intervention. However, greater benefits can be obtained by the positive interaction of mechanisms involved in neuroplasticity through learning or rehabilitation. Further studies are needed to define the most appropriate NIBS paradigm technique, and what the best combination with rehabilitation, towards a customization of symptomatic therapy and repair strategy. Finally, a more recent avenue of research, with promising preclinical findings, is the use of NIBS to prompt endogenous repair mechanisms, such as remyelination.
Disclosure: L. Leocani: nothing to disclose

Abstract: 159

Type: Oral

Non-invasive brain stimulation-NIBS techniques are widely applied to sevral neurological diseases evaluation and treatment. Repeated NIBS sessions are able to modulate neuronal activity over stimulation period facilitating neuroplasticity. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has already been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat major depression that has not responded to drugs. More recently, both this and other NIBS techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), have been applied to improve sensory or motor symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), such as chronic pain or walking impairment. Promising results have been observed after the application of NIBS as isolated intervention. However, greater benefits can be obtained by the positive interaction of mechanisms involved in neuroplasticity through learning or rehabilitation. Further studies are needed to define the most appropriate NIBS paradigm technique, and what the best combination with rehabilitation, towards a customization of symptomatic therapy and repair strategy. Finally, a more recent avenue of research, with promising preclinical findings, is the use of NIBS to prompt endogenous repair mechanisms, such as remyelination.
Disclosure: L. Leocani: nothing to disclose

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies