Diet quality is associated with mobility and cognitive function in people with multiple sclerosis
Author(s): ,
K. Fitzgerald
Affiliations:
Neurology
,
L. Mische
Affiliations:
Neurology
,
M. Beier
Affiliations:
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States
,
P. Calabresi
Affiliations:
Neurology
E. Mowry
Affiliations:
Neurology
ECTRIMS Online Library. Fitzgerald K. Oct 10, 2018; 228209; P364
Kathryn Fitzgerald
Kathryn Fitzgerald
Contributions
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Abstract

Abstract: P364

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Clinical aspects of MS - Epidemiology

Background: People with multiple sclerosis (MS) are at increased risk of metabolic disorders like diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Aspects of diet are important determinants of metabolic comorbidities in the general population and influence mechanisms relevant to MS (immune/mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and action of gut microbiota). However, evidence linking diet with objective MS outcomes is sparse.
Objective: To assess the association between diet quality and disability and neurological function in people with MS.
Methods: We conducted an observational study of people with MS who completed MS Performance Test-based (MSPT) assessment of neurologic function and a 153-item food frequency questionnaire. For each individual, we calculated the Healthy Eating Index-2010, which is a composite measure of dietary quality favorably weighting an individual's intake of fruits, vegetables, legumes, seafood/plant proteins, whole grains, mono/polyunsaturated fat, other proteins and unfavorably weighting intakes of sodium, added-sugars and refined grains. Scores ranged from 0 (poorest quality) to 100 (optimal quality). We evaluated the association between diet scores and MS outcomes including disability (Patient Determined Disease Steps [PDDS]) and objective neurological outcomes (walking speed, manual dexterity and processing speed) using generalized linear models, as appropriate and adjusting for age, sex, disease subtype and duration, years of education and body mass index (BMI).
Results: We analyzed data from 277 participants (78% female, mean age: 48.2y [standard deviation; SD: 12.7y], mean BMI: 28.2 [SD: 7.5]) who completed MSPT and diet assessments. Participants in the highest quartile of dietary quality had significantly higher processing speeds, faster 25-foot walking speeds and marginally faster manual dexterity speeds relative to individuals in the lowest quartile (Q4 vs. Q1: adjusted mean difference for processing speed 3.87 [95% CI: 0.19-7.55]; P=0.02; for walking speed: 14% faster [95% CI: 4%-23%]; P=0.009; for manual dexterity: 6% faster; 95% CI: -2%-14%; P=0.08). Individuals in the highest quartile were also at a significantly lower risk of moderate vs. mild disability (OR: 0.25; 95% CI: 0.07-0.84; P=0.03).
Conclusions: High dietary quality was associated with lesser disease severity using measures of disability, mobility and cognitive function. Longitudinal studies should evaluate if high quality diets predict slower rates of disability accrual.
Disclosure: Dr. Fitzgerald has nothing to disclose; Ms. Mische has nothing to disclose; Dr. Beier has nothing to disclose; Dr. Calabresi has received personal honorariums for consulting from Biogen and Disarm Therapeutics. He is PI on research grants to Johns Hopkins from MedImmune, Annexon, and Genzyme; Dr. Mowry reports receiving free glatiramer acetate for the investigator-initiated vitamin D trial, of which she is the PI from Teva Neuroscience provides. She is also the PI of investigator-initiated studies funded by Biogen, Sanofi-Genzyme. She is also a site investigator of trials sponsored by Sun Pharma, Biogen and royalties from Up-to-date.

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