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Alterations along the posterior visual pathway in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis
Author(s): ,
R. Datta
Affiliations:
Neurology
,
J. Sollee
Affiliations:
Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia
,
A. Lavery
Affiliations:
Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia
,
S. Dolui
Affiliations:
Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
,
K. Karoscik
Affiliations:
Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia
,
G. Liu
Affiliations:
Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia
,
B. Banwell
Affiliations:
Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States
A. Waldman
Affiliations:
Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States
ECTRIMS Online Library. Datta R.
Oct 12, 2018; 228830
Ritobrato Datta
Ritobrato Datta
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Abstract: P988

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Clinical aspects of MS - Paediatric MS

Introduction: White matter lesions in the visual pathway are common in pediatric MS, and could have a negative down-stream impact on the visual cortex.
Aim of study: To evaluate relationships between tissue integrity in the optic radiations and thickness of the visual cortex in pediatric-onset MS patients.
Methods: 20 MS patients (11 females, mean age 18 yrs [range 13-24], mean disease duration 3 yrs, median EDSS 1, 0-3.5), and 22 healthy controls (16 females, mean age 17 yrs [range 13-22]) were imaged on the same 3T Siemens Verio scanner using a 32 channel coil. T1 FLASH, DTI and FLAIR images were analysed for the current study. Cortical mantle thickness maps were reconstructed using freesurfer toolkit, fractional anisotropy (FA) of optic radiations was calculated using FSL tools and Juliech Histological Atlas and T2 lesion volumes were calculated on FLAIR images using Lesion Segmentation Toolbox.
Results: Mean visual cortical mantle thickness [2.06mm (SD 0.1) versus 2.17mm (SD 0.1), p = 0.001] and mean FA of the optic radiations was reduced in MS patients compared with controls [0.4 (SD 0.02) versus 0.44 (SD 0.02), p = 0.002]. T2 lesion volume in the optic radiations of the MS patients was 1897 mm3 (SD 2390). Visual cortex thickness correlated with FA of the optic radiations in the MS group (R = 0.52, p = 0.02), but not in controls. Lesions in the optic radiations negatively impacted the optic radiation FA (R = -0.65, p-value = 0.002), but did not correlate with visual cortex thickness (R = -0.3, p value 0.2).
Conclusions: Pediatric-onset MS is associated with thinning of the visual cortex which appears to be driven by loss of integrity in the optic radiations, rather than regional white matter lesions.
Disclosure: Dr. Banwell serves as a consultant to Novartis, for work unrelated to her MS research.
Dr. Datta has nothing to disclose.
Dr. Lavery has nothing to disclose.
Dr. Dolui has nothing to disclose.
Dr. Waldman has nothing relevant to disclose.
Ms. Karoscik has nothing relevant to disclose.
Ms. Liu has nothing to disclose.
Mr. Sollee has nothing to disclose.
Funding Source: NIH - NINDS K23NS069806; CHOP Foerderer Award (PI, Waldman).

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