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Sex differences in peripheral B cell composition underlie more progressive disease course in male patients
Author(s): ,
F. Gilli
Affiliations:
Neurology
,
K. DiSano
Affiliations:
Neurology
,
A. Rawson
Affiliations:
Pathology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, United States
,
D. Royce
Affiliations:
Neurology
,
A. Smith
Affiliations:
Neurology
,
J. Pfeiffer
Affiliations:
Pathology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, United States
,
A. Andrew
Affiliations:
Neurology
A. Pachner
Affiliations:
Neurology
ECTRIMS Online Library. Gilli F. Oct 12, 2018; 228851; P1009
Francesca Gilli
Francesca Gilli
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Abstract: P1009

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Clinical aspects of MS - MS and gender

Background/Goals: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in women tends to be more inflammatory, whereas men usually display a more progressive course. Underlying mechanisms of sexual dimorphism in the immune response are likely responsible for this dimorphic disease course. A role of B cells in MS is well established and their characterization may be important for understanding the disease. In this setting, we investigated the sexual dimorphism in peripheral B cells composition, as well as its impact on MS disease course.
Material/Methods: Peripheral blood was obtained from 119 (53 males and 66 women) healthy controls and 88 (24 males and 64 females) patients with different forms of MS. A B cell flow cytometric immunophenotyping panel was used to identify CD20+/CD19+ B cell subpopulations including immature, T3/naïve, innate/tissue homing, IgM+ memory B cells, non-switched and class-switched memory B cells subsets, plasmablasts and plasma cells. 23 patients (3 males and 20 females) were omitted from the analysis because treated with drugs known to affect B cell composition.
Results: Male healthy controls had lower age-adjusted percentages of IgM+ memory B cells (p=0.061) compared to their female counterpart. In MS patients, multivariate analysis revealed that male sex (p=0.068; OR=0.73) and a progressive disease course (p=0.07; OR=1.63) are associated with lower IgM+ memory B cells.
Discussion: Our findings show that peripheral IgM+ memory B cells are reduced in men compared to women. Lower IgM+ memory B cells correlated with a progressive disease course in MS. Further studies are underway to investigate the relationship between IgM+ memory B cells and MS progression.
Disclosure: FG, KD, AR, DR, AS, JP, AA, and AP have nothing to disclosure.
This study was supported by internal funds from the Department of Pathology at DHMC.

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