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Introducing Multiple Screening: a self-explanatory digital screening tool for cognitive deficits in MS
Author(s): ,
L. van Dongen
Affiliations:
Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam
,
B. Westerik
Affiliations:
Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam
,
K. van der Hiele
Affiliations:
Leiden University, Leiden
,
L.H. Visser
Affiliations:
St. Elisabeth hospital, Tilburg, The Netherlands
,
M.M. Schoonheim
Affiliations:
Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam
,
L. Douw
Affiliations:
Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam
,
J.J.G. Geurts
Affiliations:
Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam
H.E. Hulst
Affiliations:
Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam
ECTRIMS Online Library. van Dongen L. Oct 12, 2018; 228872
Lieke van Dongen
Lieke van Dongen
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Abstract: P1030

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Clinical aspects of MS - Clinical assessment tools

Introduction: Cognitive deficits affect up to 70% of all MS patients and have a large impact on day-to-day life. Measurements of cognitive functioning are time-consuming and often only performed when symptoms are already present, hampering timely identification and adequate monitoring of cognitive changes over time.
Aim: To develop a time-efficient, self-explanatory, digital tool that reliably measures cognitive deficits in MS.
Methods: A digital (adjusted) version of the Brief International Cognitive Assessment for MS (BICAMS) was developed, including tests for information processing speed (symbol digit modalities test (SDMT)), verbal learning and memory (Dutch version of the California Verbal Learning and Memory Test (CVLT)) and spatial memory (Spatial Recall Test (SPART) instead of the Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised (BVMT-R), originally part of BICAMS).
The clarity and feasibility of the tool was confirmed by 16 patients with MS, resulting in a self-explanatory iPad tool (Multiple Screening intellectual property of Sanofi Genzyme) that can assess cognitive performance in the absence of an observer. The tests included in the tool were compared to paper-and-pencil versions of the same tests (parallel versions, randomized order) in 60 healthy controls (HCs, 20 men, mean age 44.5 years (standard deviation (SD) 14.0, range 18-69) and varying educational level (N=18 high; N=24 average; N=18 low). Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC, two-way mixed effects model, relative agreement, single rater) were calculated to describe how strongly both forms of assessment resemble each other.
Results: ICCs between iPad and paper-and-pencil assessment were excellent for the SDMT (ICC 0.791, p< 0.001, range 0.67-0.87) and CVLT (ICC 0.766, p< 0.001, range 0.64-0.85) and good for the SPART (ICC 0.605, p< 0.001, range 0.42-0.75). From N=236 HCs (93 men, mean age 42.78 years (SD 12.81, range 18-67) norm scores are currently being calculated.
Conclusion: Performance on an adjusted (iPad) version of the BICAMS correlates very well with the standard paper-and-pencil test scores in HCs. Using norm-data, this digital tool will help clinicians to screen for cognitive deficits in MS patients in a general hospital setting. Ideally, the tool will be used before onset of complaints and to monitor cognitive changes over time. Ultimately, this tool will allow for timely identification of and subsequent counseling for patients with MS that suffer from cognitive deficits.
Disclosure: L. van Dongen has nothing to disclose. B. Westerik received a grant from Sanofi Genzyme to work on the current project. K. van der Hiele received honoraria for consultancies, presentations and advisory boards from Sanofi Genzyme and Merck Serono. L.H. Visser received honoraria for lectures, grants for research and honoraria for advisory boards from Sanofi Genzyme, Merck Serono, Novartis and Teva. M.M. Schoonheim serves on the editorial board of Frontiers of Neurology, receives research support from the Dutch MS Research Foundation, grant number 13-820, and has received compensation for consulting services or speaker honoraria from ExceMed, Genzyme and Biogen. L. Douw receives research support from Society in Science (Branco Weiss Fellowship). J.J.G. Geurts is an editor of MS journal and serves on the editorial boards of Neurology and Frontiers of Neurology and is president of the Netherlands organization for health research and innovation and has served as a consultant for Merck-Serono, Biogen, Novartis, Genzyme and Teva Pharmaceuticals. H.E. Hulst receives research support from the Dutch MS Research Foundation, grant number 12-548, and has received compensation for consulting services or speaker honoraria from Sanofi Genzyme, Merck Serono and Biogen Idec.

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