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Increased functional efficiency of the sensorimotor network is associated with disability in multiple sclerosis
Author(s): ,
M. Strik
Affiliations:
Department of Anatomy and Neurosciences, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Radiology and Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
,
D.T. Chard
Affiliations:
Department of Neuroinflammation, NMR Research Unit, Queen Square MS Centre, UCL Institute of Neurology; National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) University College London Hospitals (UCLH) Biomedical Research Centre, London, United Kingdom
,
I. Dekker
Affiliations:
Department of Neurology; Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
,
M. Pardini
Affiliations:
Department of Neuroinflammation, NMR Research Unit, Queen Square MS Centre, UCL Institute of Neurology; Department of Neurosciences, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics and Maternal and Child Health, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy
,
K.A. Meijer
Affiliations:
Department of Anatomy and Neurosciences, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
,
A.J.C. Eijlers
Affiliations:
Department of Anatomy and Neurosciences, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
,
B.M.J. Uitdehaag
Affiliations:
Department of Neurology
,
S.C. Kolbe
Affiliations:
Department of Radiology and Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
,
J.J.G. Geurts
Affiliations:
Department of Anatomy and Neurosciences, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
M.M. Schoonheim
Affiliations:
Department of Anatomy and Neurosciences, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
ECTRIMS Online Library. Strik M. Oct 12, 2018; 228953; P1113
Myrte Strik
Myrte Strik
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Abstract: P1113

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Pathology and pathogenesis of MS - MRI and PET

Background: Motor impairment is a highly disabling symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS). Functional connectivity of sensorimotor networks is altered in MS patients with motor disability, but reported relationships between functional connectivity and motor impairments are inconsistent. We aimed to directly compare functional connectivity of the sensorimotor network and the presence or absence of overt motor disability.
Methods: This study included data from 222 MS patients and 82 healthy controls (HC), part of the Amsterdam MS Cohort. Patients were divided into two groups based on the severity of their motor disability: low disability (expanded disability status scale (EDSS)< 4,n=185) and high disability (EDSS≥6,n=37).
Resting-state functional MRI scans were used to calculate functional connectivity (FC) between 23 sensorimotor regions of interest, including cortical, subcortical and cerebellar areas. Two network measures were calculated: global efficiency (GE) of the entire sensorimotor network, and local efficiency (LE) of each region. GE and LE were compared between groups with general linear models corrected for age and sex. A binary logistic regression model including GE, LE, atrophy measures and demographics, was used to predict disability status in patients. Regions where LE significantly contributed to the regression model were further explored by examining FC to other sensorimotor regions, and by correlating LE with functional system scores (FSS).
Results: Patients with high disability demonstrated significantly higher GE compared to HC, and higher LE of the left premotor, primary and secondary sensory cortices and right pallidum compared to patients with low disability and HC. GE and LE in patients with low disability did not differ from HC. The regression model (R2=0.38) included disease duration, deep grey matter volume and LE of the left primary somatosensory cortex (S1) as significant predictors of disability status. In high disability patients FC was higher between S1 and prefrontal and secondary sensory areas compared to low disability and control subjects. Higher LE of S1 significantly correlated with pyramidal, brainstem and sensory FSS.
Conclusion: High disability MS patients displayed increased GE and LE in the sensorimotor network. Specifically, LE in S1 predicted disability status independent from general disease characteristics indicating that functional adaptations in S1 play an important role in disability progression.
Disclosure: Myrte Strik reports no conflicts of interest.
Declan Chard has received honoraria (paid to his employer) from Excemed for faculty-led education work; had meeting expenses funded by Merck, MS Trust, National MS Society, Novartis, Société des Neurosciences and Swiss MS Society; and has previously held stock in GlaxoSmithKline.
Iris Dekker has received speaking honoraria from Roche, and receives funding from the Dutch MS Research Foundation, grant number 14-358e.
Matteo Pardini receives research support from Novartis and has received honoraria from Merk Serono, outside the submitted work.
Kim Meijer receives funding from a research grant of Biogen.
Anand Eijlers receives funding from the Dutch MS Research Foundation, grant number 14-358e.
Bernard Uitdehaag reports personal fees from Genzyme, Biogen Idec, TEVA, Merck Serono, Roche, outside the submitted work.
Scott Kolbe receives grant income from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and has received honoraria from Novartis and Biogen.
Jeroen Geurts is an editor of MS journal and serves on the editorial boards of Neurology and Frontiers of Neurology and is president of the Netherlands organization for health research and innovation and has served as a consultant for Merck-Serono, Biogen, Novartis, Genzyme and Teva Pharmaceuticals.
Menno Schoonheim serves on the editorial board of Frontiers of Neurology, receives research support from the Dutch MS Research Foundation, grant number 13-820, and has received compensation for consulting services or speaker honoraria from ExceMed, Genzyme and Biogen.

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