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DTI alterations in the thalamic connectivity-based regions in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis
Author(s): ,
R. Datta
Affiliations:
Neurology, Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, United States
,
C. Till
Affiliations:
York University, Toronto, ON
,
E. DeSomma
Affiliations:
York University, Toronto, ON
,
E. Barlow-Krelina
Affiliations:
York University, Toronto, ON
,
N. Akbar
Affiliations:
York University, Toronto, ON
,
S. Narayanan
Affiliations:
Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC
,
D. Arnold
Affiliations:
Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC
,
E.A. Yeh
Affiliations:
Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
B. Banwell
Affiliations:
Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States
ECTRIMS Online Library. Datta R.
Oct 12, 2018; 228977
Ritobrato Datta
Ritobrato Datta
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Abstract: P1137

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Pathology and pathogenesis of MS - MRI and PET

Introduction: The thalamus is composed of heterogeneous structures, each with connections to cortical and subcortical areas that serve specific functions. While total brain volume loss and an even greater loss of thalamic volume have been reported in pediatric-onset MS, intra-thalamic tissue integrity has not been evaluated.
Aim of Study: We evaluated a cohort of pediatric-onset MS patients imaged prior to cognitive and physical impairment to determine whether intrathalamic tissue integrity measured using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is impaired early in the disease.
Methods: 64 direction DTI scans collected at York University using a 3T scanner with 32 channel head coil, were analyzed from 31 healthy controls (mean age=18 yrs, SD=3; 25 females) and 23 pediatric-onset MS patients (mean age=18 yrs, SD=3; 17 females, median EDSS 1.5, range 1-6). Mean fractional anisotropy (FA), mean and radial diffusivity (MD and RD) values were extracted from seven thalamic connectivity based regions - primary motor, sensory, occipital, prefrontal, premotor, posterior parietal, temporal and whole thalamus (identified using Oxford thalamic connectivity atlas) and compared between groups.
Results: Whole-thalamus MD was significantly reduced in MS (p < 0.0005) while FA was modestly reduced in MS compared to healthy controls (p = 0.06). Of the regions analyzed, FA was reduced in the occipital and temporal connectivity regions in MS patients (p < 0.0005). MD and RD of the occipital, posterior-parietal, temporal (p < 0.0005 uncorrected) and pre-frontal (p < 0.001) regions were increased in the MS group. Total normalized thalamic volume was smaller in MS patients (p < 0.0005) but total brain volume did not differ between the groups.
Conclusions: Intrathalamic tissue integrity is compromised in pediatric-onset MS, supporting loss of thalamic structural integrity as an early aspect of MS pathobiology. Further studies will evaluate thalamocortical tracts and regional cortical mantle thickness to define their relationships with thalamic integrity.
Disclosure: Dr. Banwell serves as a consultant to Novartis, for work unrelated to her MS research.
Dr. Narayanan reports personal fees from NeuroRx Research and a speaker´s honorarium from Novartis Canada, unrelated to the submitted work.
Dr. Arnold: Disclosure: Dr. Arnold reports personal fees for consulting from Acorda, Biogen,
Hoffman LaRoche, MedImmune, Mitsubishi, Novartis, Receptos, Sanofi-Aventis; grants from Biogen and Novartis; and an equity interest in NeuroRx Research.
Dr. Yeh: Novartis- speaker's honorarium, Teva unrestricted funding for an educational symposium, Juno Therapeutics, Scientific Advisory Panel. ACI, relapse adjudication.
Drs. Datta, Till, Akbar have nothing relevant to disclose.
Ms. DeSomma, Ms. Barlow-Krelina have nothing to disclose.

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