Brain MRI abnormalities in MOG-IgG and AQP4-IgG seropositive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder
Author(s): ,
F. Schmidt
Affiliations:
Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin; Neuro Cure Clinical Research Center (NCRC), Charité-Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
,
N. Borisow
Affiliations:
Neuro Cure Clinical Research Center (NCRC), Charité-Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
,
K. Ruprecht
Affiliations:
Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin
,
J. Bellmann-Strobl
Affiliations:
Neuro Cure Clinical Research Center (NCRC), Charité-Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
,
A. Brandt
Affiliations:
Neuro Cure Clinical Research Center (NCRC), Charité-Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
,
F. Paul
Affiliations:
Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin; Neuro Cure Clinical Research Center (NCRC), Charité-Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
M. Scheel
Affiliations:
Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin; Neuro Cure Clinical Research Center (NCRC), Charité-Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany
ECTRIMS Online Library. Schmidt F. Oct 12, 2018; 228980; P1140
Felix Schmidt
Felix Schmidt
Contributions
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Abstract

Abstract: P1140

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Pathology and pathogenesis of MS - MRI and PET

Aims: To explore differences in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics between myelin oligodendrocyte (MOG) immunoglobulin (Ig)G+ and AQP4-IgG+ neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD).
Methods: Thirty-three AQP4-IgG and 14 MOG-IgG seropositive NMOSD patients and 61 healthy control subjects were included. All 108 participants were investigated with the same standardized MRI-protocol on a 3-Tesla MRI-scanner. The cerebral T2-lesion load (total number and volume of brain lesions) and brain volume (total and partial) was assessed.
Results: MOG-IgG and AQP4-IgG positive cohorts showed no significant differences in age, sex and disease duration. MOG-IgG+ patients showed more clinical disease activity than AQP4-IgG+ patients with a significantly higher annualized relapse rate (1.4±1.3 vs. 0.7±0.5, p=0.02). MOG-IgG+ patients had a lower cerebral lesion number (p=0.02) and total lesion volume (p=0.03) compared to AQP4-IgG+ patients. MOG-IgG+ patients showed lower amygdala volumes (p=0.03) and a trend for higher whole brain volumes (p=0.1) compared to AQP4-IgG+ patients.
Conclusions: Brain MRI lesion load in MOG-IgG+ patients was significantly lower compared to AQP4-IgG+ patients even though MOG-IgG+ patients presented with a higher annualized relapse rate. Our results suggest that MOG-IgG+ and AQP4-IgG+ NMOSD patients might differ in cerebral MRI characteristics. A limitation of our study is that we did not compare spinal MRI results between both disease entities.
Disclosure: FS has received speaker honoraria from Genzyme and travel grants from Biogen and Teva Pharmaceuticals, outside the submitted work.
KR was supported by the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF/KKNMS, Competence Network Multiple Sclerosis) and has received research support from Novartis and Merck Serono as well as speaking fees and travel grants from Guthy Jackson Charitable Foundation, Bayer Healthcare, Biogen Idec, Merck Serono, sanofi-aventis/Genzyme, Teva Pharmaceuticals, Roche and Novartis.
JBS has received travel grants and speaking fees from Bayer Healthcare, Biogen Idec, Merck Serono, sanofi-aventis/Genzyme, Teva Pharmaceuticals, and Novartis
F Paul reports grants from BMBF, grants from BMBF, grants from DFG, grants from
GJCF, grants from Novartis, personal fees from Bayer, Teva, Genzyme, Merck,
MedImmune and Novartis, outside the submitted work.
M. Scheel has nothing to disclose.
NB has nothing to disclose.
AUB is cofounder and shareholder of Motognosis and Nocturne. He is named as inventor on several patent applications regarding MS serum biomarkers, OCT image analysis and perceptive visual computing.

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