Multitasking in multiple sclerosis: an ecological approach to patient's impairment
Author(s): ,
M.B. Eizaguirre
Affiliations:
Multiple Sclerosis Clinic. University Centre of Neurology - J. M. Ramos Mejía Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina
,
A. Marinangeli
Affiliations:
Multiple Sclerosis Clinic. University Centre of Neurology - J. M. Ramos Mejía Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina
,
R. Alonso
Affiliations:
Multiple Sclerosis Clinic. University Centre of Neurology - J. M. Ramos Mejía Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina
,
B. Silva
Affiliations:
Multiple Sclerosis Clinic. University Centre of Neurology - J. M. Ramos Mejía Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina
,
S. Vanotti
Affiliations:
Multiple Sclerosis Clinic. University Centre of Neurology - J. M. Ramos Mejía Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina
O. Garcea
Affiliations:
Multiple Sclerosis Clinic. University Centre of Neurology - J. M. Ramos Mejía Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina
ECTRIMS Online Library. Eizaguirre M. Oct 12, 2018; 229008; P1168
María Bárbara Eizaguirre
María Bárbara Eizaguirre
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: P1168

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Pathology and pathogenesis of MS - Neuropsychology

Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients usually show cognitive and motor deficits. These deficits are regularly assessed separately, however recent studies have found an interaction when these tasks are performed simultaneously (Cognitive-Motor Interaction, CMI). The research in CMI allows a more ecological approach to the description of MS symptoms.
Objectives: 1) To compare performance in CMI between MS patients and healthy controls. 2) To analyze performance in CMI between patients with and without cognitive impairment. 3) To examine the relationship between CMI and activities of daily living (ADL).
Methods: sixty two patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 20 healthy controls were included. Patients age: 37.05 ± 11.11; education: 13.34 ± 3.24; Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS): 2.45 ± 1.29; Disease evolution: 9.53 ± 9.02. Controls age: 34.00 ± 14.25; education: 14.75 ± 2.17.
Outcome measures: Clinical variables: EDSS; Depression Inventory II. Cognitive variables: BICAMS Battery. Patients were classified as being impaired if they scored lower than −1.5 SD on at least two test measure, according to validated norms (Vanotti et al, 2016; Roy et al, 2017). Dual tasks: Two cognitive-motor interaction tasks (walking while performing verbal fluency/counting). The measure of the difference between subject performance in the simple task versus dual task was obtained. It was quantified as: time, number of steps and cognitive performance; ADL: MS Quality of life (MusiQol) ADL subscale. Association between variables were analyzed with Spearman correlations, simple lineal regression and t tests.
Results: Patients and controls were matched by age and education (p=0.268; p=0.083). Significant differences were found between patients and controls in CMI, in the time (fluency p=0.044; counting p=0.024), the steps of the counting task (p=0.024) and in the performance of both cognitive tasks (fluency p= 0.017; counting p=0.001). No significant differences in CMI were found when patients were separated into groups with and without cognitive impairment. Significant negative correlations were found between CMI and ADL (r=-.557-.568). ICM constituted as a predictor of performance in ADL (R2: .529, p: .002).
Conclusions: Patients with MS show alterations in cognitive-motor tasks, even those without cognitive impairment. This performance has an impact in ADL that should be considered in patient's treatment.
Disclosure: Eizaguirre María Bárbara: nothing to disclose
Marinangeli Aldana: nothing to disclose
Alonso Ricardo: has received reimbursement for developing educational presentations, educational grants and travel stipends from Biogen, Genzyme, Merck, Novartis and Roche.
Silva Berenice: nothing to disclose
Vanotti Sandra: has received reimbursement for developing educational presentations from Biogen Argentina and Novartis Argentina.
Garcea Orlando:has received reimbursement for developing educational presentations, educational and research grants, consultations fees and travel stipends from Biogen, Genzyme, Merck.

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