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Spinal cord lesions correlate with blood sNfL levels in multiple sclerosis
Author(s): ,
F. Steffen
Affiliations:
Neurology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
,
J. Piepgras
Affiliations:
Neurology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
,
V. Fleischer
Affiliations:
Neurology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
,
F. Luessi
Affiliations:
Neurology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
,
S. Groppa
Affiliations:
Neurology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
,
F. Zipp
Affiliations:
Neurology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
S. Bittner
Affiliations:
Neurology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
ECTRIMS Online Library. Steffen F. Oct 12, 2018; 229018
Falk Steffen
Falk Steffen
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Abstract: P1178

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Pathology and pathogenesis of MS - Biomarkers

Background: Neurofilament light chain (NfL) is a highly promising peripheral blood biomarker, indicating acute and chronic axonal damage in MS patients. Serum NfL (sNfL) levels correlate with lesion volume as well as blood-brain barrier disruption and might have prognostic value regarding disease progression. Spinal cord lesions are associated with a higher risk of conversion from clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) to clinically definite MS (CDMS) and with prognosis after 2 years of disease course. Since the spinal cord reflects only 2% of the whole CNS tissue volume, our question was whether spinal cord lesions translate into sNfL changes.
Objectives: To evaluate the correlation between spinal cord lesions and sNfL in MS patients.
Methods: sNfL levels were obtained by ultra-sensitive single molecule array technology in relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) patients with whole spinal cord MRI.
Results: From a cohort of 927 RRMS patients, we selected 98 patients with whole spinal cord MRI and sNfL levels and at least one follow-up. sNfL levels were significantly increased in patients showing one or more lesions in the spinal cord compared to patients without spinal cord involvement (n=20). Next, we selected patients with active spinal cord inflammation at the time point of sNfL assessment (defined as either depicting gadolinium-enhancing lesions in one MRI or new T2 lesions in a follow-up MRI) and compared this group with stable patients (no contrast enhancement and no additional spinal cord lesions in follow-up MRI). Patients with active spinal cord inflammation exhibited significantly elevated sNfL levels compared to patients with stable spinal MRI. sNfL was further correlated with clinical parameters and cranial MRI lesions.
Conclusion: Both the presence of spinal cord lesions over time as well as the occurrence of new spinal cord lesions correlate with an increase in sNfL levels in the peripheral blood of RRMS patients.
Disclosure: Falk Steffen has nothing to disclose.
Johannes Piepgras has nothing to disclose.
Vinzenz Fleischer has nothing to disclose.
Felix Luessi has nothing to disclose.
Sergiu Groppa has nothing to disclose.
Frauke Zipp has nothing to disclose.
Stefan Bittner has nothing to disclose.

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