Pregnancy related and perinatal outcomes among Danish women with multiple sclerosis. A nationwide population-based registry study
ECTRIMS Online Library. Balslev Andersen J. 09/13/19; 278347; P1145
Johanna Balslev Andersen
Johanna Balslev Andersen
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: P1145

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Clinical aspects of MS - Pregnancy in MS

J. Balslev Andersen1, T. Iskov Kopp1, F. Sellebjerg2, M. Magyari2

1The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry, 2The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Center, Department of Neurology, University Hospital Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) occurs predominantly in women and the first symptoms are often experienced in the reproductive years. According to the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry (DMSR) the mean age at onset is 35.5 years among women.
Objective: The purpose of our study was to investigate whether pregnancy related and perinatal outcomes among women diagnosed with MS differ from those of the general population.
Methods: All women with MS registered in the nationwide population-based DMSR and a randomly selected sub-cohort from the general population matched on age at MS diagnosis were linked to The Danish Medical Birth Register and The Danish Civil Registration System. From these registries we obtained demographic data on all women, course of pregnancy, pregnancy related data and perinatal data. Data on all pregnancies resulting in either live - or stillbirth from 1997-2016 from women with MS were compared with those of the general population.
Results: In all, our cohort consisted of 5,760 pregnancies from women with MS and 27,664 pregnancies from the general population. Perinatal outcomes and pregnancy related complications in the MS cohort and the general population, respectively, consisted of: low Apgar score 0.13% vs. 0.7%, placenta accreta 0.4% vs. 0.6%, abruptio 0.5% vs. 0.7%, congenital malformations 6.7% vs. 6%, asphyxia 14.7% vs. 14.5%, premature born (< week 37) 7.6% vs. 6.7%, postpartum hemorrhage 17.9% vs. 19.6% and pregnancy complications (gestational diabetes or preeclampsia) 4.7% vs. 4.9%. Delivery outcomes resulted in 0.3% stillbirths (both groups), normal delivery 66.4% vs. 69.4%, instrumental delivery 7.9% vs. 7%, induced delivery (both groups) 2.7%, elective caesareans 10.2% vs. 7.7%, and acute caesareans 12.9% vs. 13.1% in the MS cohort and the general population, respectively.
Conclusion: Our study does not indicate any differences in either pregnancy related or perinatal outcomes between women with MS and the general population except for elective caesareans, where a higher incidence was observed among women with MS compared to the general population. This finding supports previously reported outcomes in terms of premature birth, pregnancy complications, congenital malformations and neonatal death.
Disclosure: J.B. Andersen has received travel grants and congress participation from Merck.
T.I. Kopp has nothing to disclose.
F. Sellebjerg has served on scientific advisory boards, been on the steering committees of clinical trials, served as a consultant, received support for congress participation, received speaker honoraria, or received research support for his laboratory from Biogen, Merck, Novartis, Roche, Sanofi Genzyme and Teva
M. Magyari has served on scientific advisory board for Biogen, Sanofi, Teva, Roche, Novartis, Merck, has received honoraria for lecturing from Biogen, Merck, Novartis, Sanofi, Genzyme, has received research support and support for congress participation from Biogen, Genzyme, Teva, Roche, Merck, Novartis

Abstract: P1145

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Clinical aspects of MS - Pregnancy in MS

J. Balslev Andersen1, T. Iskov Kopp1, F. Sellebjerg2, M. Magyari2

1The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry, 2The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Center, Department of Neurology, University Hospital Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) occurs predominantly in women and the first symptoms are often experienced in the reproductive years. According to the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry (DMSR) the mean age at onset is 35.5 years among women.
Objective: The purpose of our study was to investigate whether pregnancy related and perinatal outcomes among women diagnosed with MS differ from those of the general population.
Methods: All women with MS registered in the nationwide population-based DMSR and a randomly selected sub-cohort from the general population matched on age at MS diagnosis were linked to The Danish Medical Birth Register and The Danish Civil Registration System. From these registries we obtained demographic data on all women, course of pregnancy, pregnancy related data and perinatal data. Data on all pregnancies resulting in either live - or stillbirth from 1997-2016 from women with MS were compared with those of the general population.
Results: In all, our cohort consisted of 5,760 pregnancies from women with MS and 27,664 pregnancies from the general population. Perinatal outcomes and pregnancy related complications in the MS cohort and the general population, respectively, consisted of: low Apgar score 0.13% vs. 0.7%, placenta accreta 0.4% vs. 0.6%, abruptio 0.5% vs. 0.7%, congenital malformations 6.7% vs. 6%, asphyxia 14.7% vs. 14.5%, premature born (< week 37) 7.6% vs. 6.7%, postpartum hemorrhage 17.9% vs. 19.6% and pregnancy complications (gestational diabetes or preeclampsia) 4.7% vs. 4.9%. Delivery outcomes resulted in 0.3% stillbirths (both groups), normal delivery 66.4% vs. 69.4%, instrumental delivery 7.9% vs. 7%, induced delivery (both groups) 2.7%, elective caesareans 10.2% vs. 7.7%, and acute caesareans 12.9% vs. 13.1% in the MS cohort and the general population, respectively.
Conclusion: Our study does not indicate any differences in either pregnancy related or perinatal outcomes between women with MS and the general population except for elective caesareans, where a higher incidence was observed among women with MS compared to the general population. This finding supports previously reported outcomes in terms of premature birth, pregnancy complications, congenital malformations and neonatal death.
Disclosure: J.B. Andersen has received travel grants and congress participation from Merck.
T.I. Kopp has nothing to disclose.
F. Sellebjerg has served on scientific advisory boards, been on the steering committees of clinical trials, served as a consultant, received support for congress participation, received speaker honoraria, or received research support for his laboratory from Biogen, Merck, Novartis, Roche, Sanofi Genzyme and Teva
M. Magyari has served on scientific advisory board for Biogen, Sanofi, Teva, Roche, Novartis, Merck, has received honoraria for lecturing from Biogen, Merck, Novartis, Sanofi, Genzyme, has received research support and support for congress participation from Biogen, Genzyme, Teva, Roche, Merck, Novartis

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies