Multiple sclerosis and disease monitoring: the association of multi-dimensional quantitative MRI brain volumes and computerized cognitive scores of people with multiple sclerosis
ECTRIMS Online Library. Golan D. 09/13/19; 278367; P1165
Dr. Daniel Golan
Dr. Daniel Golan
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: P1165

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Clinical aspects of MS - Clinical assessment tools

D. Golan1,2, J. Srinivasan3, M. Zarif3, B. Bumstead3, M. Buhse3,4, L. Fafard3, K. Blitz3, J. Wilken5,6, C. Sullivan3, T. Fratto5, E. Van Vlierberghe7, D. Sima7, W. Van Hecke7, M. Gudesblatt3

1Department of Neurology, Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center, 2Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, 3South Shore Neurologic Associates, Patchogue, 4Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY, 5Washington Neuropsychology Research Group, Fairfax, VA, 6Department of Neurology, Georgetown University, Washington DC, WA, United States, 7Icometrix, Leuven, Belgium

Background: Cognitive impairment is common and can be disabling in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) but is not often monitored or only partially screened due to complexity of evaluation. Computerized cognitive assessment facilitates the incorporation of multi-domain cognitive monitoring into routine clinical care and management of disease progression as it relates to cognitive impact not addressed by EDSS.
Aim: To explore the associations between computerized quantitative brain volumes and cognitive scores of a computerized cognitive assessment battery (CAB, NeuroTrax) among PwMS.
Methods: PwMS underwent CAB and Brain MRI within specified time intervals in the course of routine care. The global cognitive score (GCS) is the average of age and education adjusted scores of the various cognitive domains (memory, information processing speed, attention, executive function, visuospatial, motor and verbal). Whole brain volume (WBV), Gray matter volume (GMV), White matter volume (WMV), Thalamic volume, Hippocampal volume, white matter lesion volume and lateral ventricles volume were assessed by Icobrain, from Icometrix, a fully automated tissue- and lesion segmentation and quantification software, using 3D T1-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRIs.
Results: 201 PwMS were tested with both CAB and MRI within 180 days (Age: 52.3±11.1, 143 (71%) female). Significant correlations were found between the GCS and WBV, WMV, GMV, Thalamic volume and FLAIR lesion volume (Spearman rho´s: 0.33, 0.3, 0.43, 0.4, -0.26, P< 0.01, respectively). Correlation coefficients remained significant but decreased as the time between MRI and CAB increased. The number of impaired cognitive domains was also associated with both lesion volume and GMV (rho=0.25, -0.44; P< 0.05, < 0.01, respectively) .The only cognitive domain score associated with Hippocampal volume was memory (rho=0.27, P< 0.05).
Conclusion: Computerized multi-dimensional cognitive scores are significantly associated with quantified MRI. These findings demonstrate added information and value that can be derived from integrating digital assessment tools into the routine clinical assessment and care of PwMS.
Disclosure: Daniel Golan: nothing to disclose.
Jared Srinivasan: nothing to disclose.
Myassar Zarif: nothing to disclose.
Barbara Bumstead: nothing to disclose.
Marijean Buhse: nothing to disclose.
Lori Fafard: nothing to disclose.
Karen Blitz: nothing to disclose.
Jeffrey Wilken: nothing to disclose.
Cynthia Sullivan: nothing to disclose.
Timothy Fratto: nothing to disclose.
Eline Van Vlierberghe is an employee of Icometrix.
Diana Sima is an employee of Icometrix.
Wim Van Hecke is an employee of Icometrix.
Mark Gudesblatt: nothing to disclose.

Abstract: P1165

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Clinical aspects of MS - Clinical assessment tools

D. Golan1,2, J. Srinivasan3, M. Zarif3, B. Bumstead3, M. Buhse3,4, L. Fafard3, K. Blitz3, J. Wilken5,6, C. Sullivan3, T. Fratto5, E. Van Vlierberghe7, D. Sima7, W. Van Hecke7, M. Gudesblatt3

1Department of Neurology, Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center, 2Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, 3South Shore Neurologic Associates, Patchogue, 4Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY, 5Washington Neuropsychology Research Group, Fairfax, VA, 6Department of Neurology, Georgetown University, Washington DC, WA, United States, 7Icometrix, Leuven, Belgium

Background: Cognitive impairment is common and can be disabling in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) but is not often monitored or only partially screened due to complexity of evaluation. Computerized cognitive assessment facilitates the incorporation of multi-domain cognitive monitoring into routine clinical care and management of disease progression as it relates to cognitive impact not addressed by EDSS.
Aim: To explore the associations between computerized quantitative brain volumes and cognitive scores of a computerized cognitive assessment battery (CAB, NeuroTrax) among PwMS.
Methods: PwMS underwent CAB and Brain MRI within specified time intervals in the course of routine care. The global cognitive score (GCS) is the average of age and education adjusted scores of the various cognitive domains (memory, information processing speed, attention, executive function, visuospatial, motor and verbal). Whole brain volume (WBV), Gray matter volume (GMV), White matter volume (WMV), Thalamic volume, Hippocampal volume, white matter lesion volume and lateral ventricles volume were assessed by Icobrain, from Icometrix, a fully automated tissue- and lesion segmentation and quantification software, using 3D T1-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRIs.
Results: 201 PwMS were tested with both CAB and MRI within 180 days (Age: 52.3±11.1, 143 (71%) female). Significant correlations were found between the GCS and WBV, WMV, GMV, Thalamic volume and FLAIR lesion volume (Spearman rho´s: 0.33, 0.3, 0.43, 0.4, -0.26, P< 0.01, respectively). Correlation coefficients remained significant but decreased as the time between MRI and CAB increased. The number of impaired cognitive domains was also associated with both lesion volume and GMV (rho=0.25, -0.44; P< 0.05, < 0.01, respectively) .The only cognitive domain score associated with Hippocampal volume was memory (rho=0.27, P< 0.05).
Conclusion: Computerized multi-dimensional cognitive scores are significantly associated with quantified MRI. These findings demonstrate added information and value that can be derived from integrating digital assessment tools into the routine clinical assessment and care of PwMS.
Disclosure: Daniel Golan: nothing to disclose.
Jared Srinivasan: nothing to disclose.
Myassar Zarif: nothing to disclose.
Barbara Bumstead: nothing to disclose.
Marijean Buhse: nothing to disclose.
Lori Fafard: nothing to disclose.
Karen Blitz: nothing to disclose.
Jeffrey Wilken: nothing to disclose.
Cynthia Sullivan: nothing to disclose.
Timothy Fratto: nothing to disclose.
Eline Van Vlierberghe is an employee of Icometrix.
Diana Sima is an employee of Icometrix.
Wim Van Hecke is an employee of Icometrix.
Mark Gudesblatt: nothing to disclose.

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