Comorbidities in multiple sclerosis patients in a Greek tertiary MS Center
ECTRIMS Online Library. Nikolaidis I. 09/13/19; 278399; P1197
Ioannis Nikolaidis
Ioannis Nikolaidis
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: P1197

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Clinical aspects of MS - Comorbidity

I. Nikolaidis1, C. Bakirtzis1, M. Boziki1, A. Gkouvi2, M. Meitanidou2, L. Messinis3, A. Artemiadis4, N. Grigoriadis1

12nd Department of Neurology, Aristotle University Thessaloniki, 2School of Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 3Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry, University of Patras, Patra, Greece, 4University of Cyprus, Larnaka, Cyprus

Introduction: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the Central Nervous System (CNS), often coexisting with other autoimmune diseases. However the important consequences of their interaction on disability outcomes often receive little attention in everyday clinical practice.
Aims: The aim of the study was to investigate the presence of comorbidities in Greek patients with multiple sclerosis in a tertiary MS Center in Nothern Greece.
Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted using records of 231 patients from the MS Center, 2nd Department of Neurology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.Analysis was conducted by SPSS 23.0.
Results: We processed data from 231 patients with MS (33,3% male) with 40,9 ± 11,48 mean of age. The most common comorbidity was thyroid disease among 13,9% of the patients with higher prevalence in women (19,5% vs 2,6%), followed by blood hypertension (in 8,2%), hyperlipidemia (in 6%) and diabetes mellitus in 3,9% of the patients. Also, 51,6% of the patients reported to be smokers. The correlation between the number of comorbidities claimed and the disability status (EDSS) was statistically significant (p=0,04).
Conclusions: Comorbidities in MS are common and their existence is strongly related with increased levels of disability. Their recognition and treatment can contribute to an optimal management of MS' disease burden.
Disclosure: The authors have nothing to disclosure

Abstract: P1197

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Clinical aspects of MS - Comorbidity

I. Nikolaidis1, C. Bakirtzis1, M. Boziki1, A. Gkouvi2, M. Meitanidou2, L. Messinis3, A. Artemiadis4, N. Grigoriadis1

12nd Department of Neurology, Aristotle University Thessaloniki, 2School of Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 3Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry, University of Patras, Patra, Greece, 4University of Cyprus, Larnaka, Cyprus

Introduction: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the Central Nervous System (CNS), often coexisting with other autoimmune diseases. However the important consequences of their interaction on disability outcomes often receive little attention in everyday clinical practice.
Aims: The aim of the study was to investigate the presence of comorbidities in Greek patients with multiple sclerosis in a tertiary MS Center in Nothern Greece.
Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted using records of 231 patients from the MS Center, 2nd Department of Neurology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.Analysis was conducted by SPSS 23.0.
Results: We processed data from 231 patients with MS (33,3% male) with 40,9 ± 11,48 mean of age. The most common comorbidity was thyroid disease among 13,9% of the patients with higher prevalence in women (19,5% vs 2,6%), followed by blood hypertension (in 8,2%), hyperlipidemia (in 6%) and diabetes mellitus in 3,9% of the patients. Also, 51,6% of the patients reported to be smokers. The correlation between the number of comorbidities claimed and the disability status (EDSS) was statistically significant (p=0,04).
Conclusions: Comorbidities in MS are common and their existence is strongly related with increased levels of disability. Their recognition and treatment can contribute to an optimal management of MS' disease burden.
Disclosure: The authors have nothing to disclosure

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