Gut microbiota as a new predictive factor of prognosis in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis
ECTRIMS Online Library. Méndez Miralles M. 09/13/19; 278434; P1231
María Ángeles Méndez Miralles
María Ángeles Méndez Miralles
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: P1231

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Pathology and pathogenesis of MS - Microbiology and virology

M.Á. Méndez Miralles1,2

1Neurology, Hospital Universitario de Torrevieja, Alicante, 2Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia, Murcia, Spain

Introduction: Gut microbiota and its influence on different immunological disorders has been studied in the last years. MS has an unknown etiology, but it is probably multifactorial with genetic and environmental factors. Gut microbiota has been proposed as a relevant etiological factor in recurrent remittent multiple sclerosis (RRMS).
Objectives: In this study we analyze the gut microbiota in MS patients and its relationship with the course disease
Methods: We study the gut microbiota of 16 patients with RRMS and 15 healthy controls. Gut microbiota was obtained by 16s rRNA sequencing. After a 24-months follow-up period study, a correlation analysis between microbiota data and course disease was performed. We study the presence of relapses and/or new or newly enlarged hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scan or new gadolinium-enhancing lesions on T1-weighted MRI of the brain and/or spinal cord in the preceding year and in the 24-months follow-up period.
Results: We have compared the bacterial composition in stool samples of MS patients and healthy controls. Biodiversity of gut microbiota was higher in the healthy controls compared with MS patients. The most frequent genus detected among all analyzed stool samples was Bacteroides. We have detected statistically significant differences in the levels of bacteria from the familyLachnospiraceaeand Ruminococcaceae; and the levels of the genus Gummier, Lachnoclostridium, Prevotella, Streptococcus, Ruminiclostridium, Ruminococcus, Succinivibrio and Sutterella. Our study shows a significant correlation between the number of relapses and the levels of the family Lactobacillaceae, the genus Lactobacillus and mainly with the genus Lachnoclostridium when the new relapses and new MRI lesions were considered (p< 0,05). Thirteen (81.25%) patients were treated with disease modifying therapies (DMTs) when they were enrolled in the study. Beta-interferon (5/16; 31,3%) and fingolimod (3/16; 18,8%) were the most frequent DMTs administered.
Conclusions: There are significant differences in the microbiota of MS patients from the healthy population. Some of these microorganisms are associated with a worse disease course, suggesting the role of gut microbiota composition as a predictive factor of prognosis disease.
Disclosure:
Méndez-Miralles, M.Á.: nothing to disclose
Vela-Yebra, R.: nothing to disclose
Fríes-Ramos, A. : nothing to disclose
Maruhenda Sempere, Y.: nothing to disclose
Ruzafa-Costas, B.: nothing to disclose
Chumillas-Lidón, S.: nothing to disclose
Núñez-Delicato, E.: nothing to disclose
Carrión-Gutierrez, M.A.: nothing to disclose
Navarro-López, V.: nothing to disclose

Abstract: P1231

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Pathology and pathogenesis of MS - Microbiology and virology

M.Á. Méndez Miralles1,2

1Neurology, Hospital Universitario de Torrevieja, Alicante, 2Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia, Murcia, Spain

Introduction: Gut microbiota and its influence on different immunological disorders has been studied in the last years. MS has an unknown etiology, but it is probably multifactorial with genetic and environmental factors. Gut microbiota has been proposed as a relevant etiological factor in recurrent remittent multiple sclerosis (RRMS).
Objectives: In this study we analyze the gut microbiota in MS patients and its relationship with the course disease
Methods: We study the gut microbiota of 16 patients with RRMS and 15 healthy controls. Gut microbiota was obtained by 16s rRNA sequencing. After a 24-months follow-up period study, a correlation analysis between microbiota data and course disease was performed. We study the presence of relapses and/or new or newly enlarged hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scan or new gadolinium-enhancing lesions on T1-weighted MRI of the brain and/or spinal cord in the preceding year and in the 24-months follow-up period.
Results: We have compared the bacterial composition in stool samples of MS patients and healthy controls. Biodiversity of gut microbiota was higher in the healthy controls compared with MS patients. The most frequent genus detected among all analyzed stool samples was Bacteroides. We have detected statistically significant differences in the levels of bacteria from the familyLachnospiraceaeand Ruminococcaceae; and the levels of the genus Gummier, Lachnoclostridium, Prevotella, Streptococcus, Ruminiclostridium, Ruminococcus, Succinivibrio and Sutterella. Our study shows a significant correlation between the number of relapses and the levels of the family Lactobacillaceae, the genus Lactobacillus and mainly with the genus Lachnoclostridium when the new relapses and new MRI lesions were considered (p< 0,05). Thirteen (81.25%) patients were treated with disease modifying therapies (DMTs) when they were enrolled in the study. Beta-interferon (5/16; 31,3%) and fingolimod (3/16; 18,8%) were the most frequent DMTs administered.
Conclusions: There are significant differences in the microbiota of MS patients from the healthy population. Some of these microorganisms are associated with a worse disease course, suggesting the role of gut microbiota composition as a predictive factor of prognosis disease.
Disclosure:
Méndez-Miralles, M.Á.: nothing to disclose
Vela-Yebra, R.: nothing to disclose
Fríes-Ramos, A. : nothing to disclose
Maruhenda Sempere, Y.: nothing to disclose
Ruzafa-Costas, B.: nothing to disclose
Chumillas-Lidón, S.: nothing to disclose
Núñez-Delicato, E.: nothing to disclose
Carrión-Gutierrez, M.A.: nothing to disclose
Navarro-López, V.: nothing to disclose

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies