Use and impacts of cannabis for therapeutic purposes by patients with multiple sclerosis in France and Spain - results from an online patient community
ECTRIMS Online Library. Verjus T. 09/13/19; 278627; P1427
Thomas Verjus
Thomas Verjus
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: P1427

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Therapy - Symptomatic treatment

J. Chatenet, P. Legendre, R. Dos Santos, L. Radoszycki, T. Verjus

Carenity, Paris, France

Background and objectives: In France, the possession and use of cannabis is a penal offence. In Spain, legislation allows the consumption and cultivation of cannabis in private. Some cannabis-based pharmaceutical products, such as Nabiximols, have marketing authorisation in both countries but are only available to patients in Spain.
The objective of this study were (1) to better understand the use of cannabis for therapeutic purposes by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), (2) to evaluate its impact on MS symptoms and (3) to compare the results in France and Spain, two countries with different legislations.
Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study is currently being conducted in France and Spain via Carenity.com, a global online patient community. All patients with MS, living in France or Spain, were invited to participate in an online survey from April 2019.
Results: 433 respondents completed the questionnaire and have been included in the study so far. 68% lived in France and 32% in Spain. 72% were women and mean age was 47. MS has been diagnosed on average 12 years ago.
Respectively 22% (n=66) and 17% (n=24) of French and Spanish respondents used cannabis for therapeutic purposes. They had been using it for 4 years on average. 70% used it daily, 21% weekly and the others (9%) occasionally.
Natural products (herbs or resin) (47%) and cannabidiol based products (46%) were the most common type of cannabis used by MS patients, followed by Nabiximols (14%). The three most frequent forms were: dried herbs (47%), oil (40%) and e-liquid (17%). 58% of French people used cannabidiol based products (1% in Spain) and 1% in the form of pharmaceutical treatment (38% in Spain).
Patients mainly start using cannabis to treat spasticity (64%), relieve pain (63%) and sleep disturbances (47%). 76% of patients consider that MS-related pain has decreased due to cannabis, 77% described a positive impact on spasticity, 74% on sleep disturbances and 62% on sensibility disorders. 63% of patients who used cannabis have reduced their consumption of pain medication since they started using cannabis and 64% considered that cannabis is more effective than conventional pain treatments.
Conclusions: Regardless of the restrictions of cannabis related to the country´s legislation, the level of use and the perception of efficacy are similar. In this context, helping patients to obtain quality controlled products and supporting them in their consumption is essential.
Disclosure: Jean Chatenet: nothing to disclose
Pierre Legendre: nothing to disclose
Roman Dos Santos: nothing to disclose
Lise Radoszycki: nothing to disclose
Thomas Verjus: nothing to disclose

Abstract: P1427

Type: Poster Sessions

Abstract Category: Therapy - Symptomatic treatment

J. Chatenet, P. Legendre, R. Dos Santos, L. Radoszycki, T. Verjus

Carenity, Paris, France

Background and objectives: In France, the possession and use of cannabis is a penal offence. In Spain, legislation allows the consumption and cultivation of cannabis in private. Some cannabis-based pharmaceutical products, such as Nabiximols, have marketing authorisation in both countries but are only available to patients in Spain.
The objective of this study were (1) to better understand the use of cannabis for therapeutic purposes by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), (2) to evaluate its impact on MS symptoms and (3) to compare the results in France and Spain, two countries with different legislations.
Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study is currently being conducted in France and Spain via Carenity.com, a global online patient community. All patients with MS, living in France or Spain, were invited to participate in an online survey from April 2019.
Results: 433 respondents completed the questionnaire and have been included in the study so far. 68% lived in France and 32% in Spain. 72% were women and mean age was 47. MS has been diagnosed on average 12 years ago.
Respectively 22% (n=66) and 17% (n=24) of French and Spanish respondents used cannabis for therapeutic purposes. They had been using it for 4 years on average. 70% used it daily, 21% weekly and the others (9%) occasionally.
Natural products (herbs or resin) (47%) and cannabidiol based products (46%) were the most common type of cannabis used by MS patients, followed by Nabiximols (14%). The three most frequent forms were: dried herbs (47%), oil (40%) and e-liquid (17%). 58% of French people used cannabidiol based products (1% in Spain) and 1% in the form of pharmaceutical treatment (38% in Spain).
Patients mainly start using cannabis to treat spasticity (64%), relieve pain (63%) and sleep disturbances (47%). 76% of patients consider that MS-related pain has decreased due to cannabis, 77% described a positive impact on spasticity, 74% on sleep disturbances and 62% on sensibility disorders. 63% of patients who used cannabis have reduced their consumption of pain medication since they started using cannabis and 64% considered that cannabis is more effective than conventional pain treatments.
Conclusions: Regardless of the restrictions of cannabis related to the country´s legislation, the level of use and the perception of efficacy are similar. In this context, helping patients to obtain quality controlled products and supporting them in their consumption is essential.
Disclosure: Jean Chatenet: nothing to disclose
Pierre Legendre: nothing to disclose
Roman Dos Santos: nothing to disclose
Lise Radoszycki: nothing to disclose
Thomas Verjus: nothing to disclose

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