MS patients should be advised to take vitamin D for MS
ECTRIMS Online Library. Ascherio A. 09/11/19; 279379; 27
Alberto Ascherio
Alberto Ascherio
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: 27

Type: Hot Topic

Abstract Category: Hot Topic 3: Should we recommend vitamin D supplementation to our MS

A. Ascherio

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States

Evidence that serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D contribute to predict MS risk has grown rapidly over the past few years, and a large body of epidemiological data strongly support causality. On the other hand, establishing the role of vitamin D supplementation in the treatment of MS has proven more challenging. This is somewhat paradoxical, because one would expect that randomized clinical trials (RCT) to test the effects of vitamin D supplementation should be feasible and would provide a definitive answer. In reality, RCT of vitamin D supplementation face numerous obstacles, which have resulted in major limitations and uncertain results. Among the several problems of completed or ongoing trials are small sample sizes, short duration, exclusion of patients with vitamin D insufficiency, difficulty in recruiting, and self-medication. For these reasons, a sound decision on whether or not to recommend vitamin D supplements should be based on the totality of evidence, which include several large longitudinal observational studies. When examined critically, and in light of the safety of vitamin D supplementation, such evidence leads to the compelling conclusion that the risk/benefit ratio for moderate dose vitamin D supplementation is decisively favorable, and that supplementation should therefore be part of the treatment for most MS patients.
Disclosure: Alberto Ascherio has received funding for MS research by the National Institutes of Health and the US Department of Defense.

Abstract: 27

Type: Hot Topic

Abstract Category: Hot Topic 3: Should we recommend vitamin D supplementation to our MS

A. Ascherio

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States

Evidence that serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D contribute to predict MS risk has grown rapidly over the past few years, and a large body of epidemiological data strongly support causality. On the other hand, establishing the role of vitamin D supplementation in the treatment of MS has proven more challenging. This is somewhat paradoxical, because one would expect that randomized clinical trials (RCT) to test the effects of vitamin D supplementation should be feasible and would provide a definitive answer. In reality, RCT of vitamin D supplementation face numerous obstacles, which have resulted in major limitations and uncertain results. Among the several problems of completed or ongoing trials are small sample sizes, short duration, exclusion of patients with vitamin D insufficiency, difficulty in recruiting, and self-medication. For these reasons, a sound decision on whether or not to recommend vitamin D supplements should be based on the totality of evidence, which include several large longitudinal observational studies. When examined critically, and in light of the safety of vitamin D supplementation, such evidence leads to the compelling conclusion that the risk/benefit ratio for moderate dose vitamin D supplementation is decisively favorable, and that supplementation should therefore be part of the treatment for most MS patients.
Disclosure: Alberto Ascherio has received funding for MS research by the National Institutes of Health and the US Department of Defense.

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies