Functional imaging biomarkers of cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis: a resting-state magnetoencephalography study
ECTRIMS Online Library. Kulik S. 09/11/19; 279427; 107
Shanna Dane Kulik
Shanna Dane Kulik
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: 107

Type: Young Scientific Investigators' Session

Abstract Category: Pathology and pathogenesis of MS - Neuropsychology

S.D. Kulik1, I.M. Nauta2, B.D.W.T. Lith1, E.E.M. Strijbis2,3, P. Tewarie2, L. Douw1, A. Hillebrand3, C.J. Stam3, J.J.G. Geurts1, B.A. de Jong2, M.M. Schoonheim1

1Anatomy & Neurosciences, 2Neurology, 3Clinical Neurophysiology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Background: Previous studies have highlighted the importance of functional neuroimaging measures as biomarkers for cognitive impairment in MS. However, it remains unclear which of the previously identified measures are most promising.
Objectives: To determine which magnetoencephalography (MEG) measures best predict cognitive performance in MS, and to analyse the importance of more advanced functional brain measures (functional connectivity (FC) and network topology) relative to more basic measures (oscillatory activity).
Methods: Resting-state MEG recordings, structural MRI and neuropsychological assessments were analysed in 275 MS patients. Computed MEG measures included: peak frequency and relative power, average FC (phase lag index), clustering coefficient, path length and eigenvector centrality. Linear regression was applied to determine which combination of measures best related to cognitive performance.
Results: Worse cognitive performance was related to increased theta power (β=-0.356, p< 0.001), and decreased delta power (β=0.265, p=0.002), as well as increased beta (β=-0.234, p=0.027) but decreased gamma eigenvector centrality (β=0.240, p=0.028), and decreased alpha1 clustering (β=0.146, p=0.011). FC measures were only related to cognition at trend level (theta and gamma PLI, p< 0.1). The multivariate model (R2=0.233, p< 0.001) only showed significant relations for oscillatory activity and network topology measures and both remained unique correlates of cognition. FC did not add explanatory power.
Conclusions: Oscillatory activity and network topological properties uniquely correlated with cognition, whereas FC did not add explanatory value. This indicates that especially the combination of measures of functional activation and functional network topology hold promise as potential biomarkers.
Disclosure: S.D. Kulik reports no disclosures.
I.M. Nauta is supported by the Dutch MS Research Foundation, grant nr. 15-911.
B.D.W.T. Lith reports no disclosures.
E.M.M. Strijbis reports no disclosures.
P. Tewarie has received funding for travel from Novartis.
A. Hillebrand serves as an editorial board member of Scientific Reports and Plos One.
C.J. Stam reports no disclosures.
J.J.G. Geurts is an editor of Multiple Sclerosis Journal. He serves on the editorial boards of Neurology and Frontiers of Neurology and is president of the Netherlands organization for health research and innovation. He has served as a consultant for Merck-Serono, Biogen, Novartis, Genzyme and Teva Pharmaceuticals.
B.A. de Jong has received speaker and consulting fees from Merck-Serono, Biogen, TEVA, Genzyme and Novartis.
M.M. Schoonheim serves as an editorial board member of Frontiers in Neurology, received research support from the Dutch MS Research Foundation and consulting or speaking fees from ExceMed, Genzyme, Novartis, and Biogen.

Abstract: 107

Type: Young Scientific Investigators' Session

Abstract Category: Pathology and pathogenesis of MS - Neuropsychology

S.D. Kulik1, I.M. Nauta2, B.D.W.T. Lith1, E.E.M. Strijbis2,3, P. Tewarie2, L. Douw1, A. Hillebrand3, C.J. Stam3, J.J.G. Geurts1, B.A. de Jong2, M.M. Schoonheim1

1Anatomy & Neurosciences, 2Neurology, 3Clinical Neurophysiology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Background: Previous studies have highlighted the importance of functional neuroimaging measures as biomarkers for cognitive impairment in MS. However, it remains unclear which of the previously identified measures are most promising.
Objectives: To determine which magnetoencephalography (MEG) measures best predict cognitive performance in MS, and to analyse the importance of more advanced functional brain measures (functional connectivity (FC) and network topology) relative to more basic measures (oscillatory activity).
Methods: Resting-state MEG recordings, structural MRI and neuropsychological assessments were analysed in 275 MS patients. Computed MEG measures included: peak frequency and relative power, average FC (phase lag index), clustering coefficient, path length and eigenvector centrality. Linear regression was applied to determine which combination of measures best related to cognitive performance.
Results: Worse cognitive performance was related to increased theta power (β=-0.356, p< 0.001), and decreased delta power (β=0.265, p=0.002), as well as increased beta (β=-0.234, p=0.027) but decreased gamma eigenvector centrality (β=0.240, p=0.028), and decreased alpha1 clustering (β=0.146, p=0.011). FC measures were only related to cognition at trend level (theta and gamma PLI, p< 0.1). The multivariate model (R2=0.233, p< 0.001) only showed significant relations for oscillatory activity and network topology measures and both remained unique correlates of cognition. FC did not add explanatory power.
Conclusions: Oscillatory activity and network topological properties uniquely correlated with cognition, whereas FC did not add explanatory value. This indicates that especially the combination of measures of functional activation and functional network topology hold promise as potential biomarkers.
Disclosure: S.D. Kulik reports no disclosures.
I.M. Nauta is supported by the Dutch MS Research Foundation, grant nr. 15-911.
B.D.W.T. Lith reports no disclosures.
E.M.M. Strijbis reports no disclosures.
P. Tewarie has received funding for travel from Novartis.
A. Hillebrand serves as an editorial board member of Scientific Reports and Plos One.
C.J. Stam reports no disclosures.
J.J.G. Geurts is an editor of Multiple Sclerosis Journal. He serves on the editorial boards of Neurology and Frontiers of Neurology and is president of the Netherlands organization for health research and innovation. He has served as a consultant for Merck-Serono, Biogen, Novartis, Genzyme and Teva Pharmaceuticals.
B.A. de Jong has received speaker and consulting fees from Merck-Serono, Biogen, TEVA, Genzyme and Novartis.
M.M. Schoonheim serves as an editorial board member of Frontiers in Neurology, received research support from the Dutch MS Research Foundation and consulting or speaking fees from ExceMed, Genzyme, Novartis, and Biogen.

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