Epidemiology and risk factors: an update
ECTRIMS Online Library. Amato M. 09/12/19; 279435; 136
Maria Pia Amato
Maria Pia Amato
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: 136

Type: Educational Session

Abstract Category: Educational Session 16 (IMSCOGS): Cognitive dysfunction in MS

M.P. Amato

NEUROFARBA, University of Florence, Florence, Italy

The subtle and often insidious changes in cognition observed in multiple sclerosis (MS), unspoken of for years, are finally being given the profile and importance their impact warrants. Cognitive impairment (CI) has been reported in 30% to >65% of clinically-based studies, depending on the criterion used for definition. It has been described in all the disease stages and phenotypes, including clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS), so called 'benign MS' and pediatric-onset MS. The neuropsychological profile is mainly represented by defects in information processing speed, verbal and visuo-spatial memory and executive functions; linguistic deficits have also been detected in the pediatric group. Overall, the prevalence and severity of CI appears to be prominent in secondary and primary progressive MS patients. While controlled studies are lacking, there is consistent evidence that cognition tends to decline in patients over the long-term (10-20 years). The study of risk or protecting factors that may influence the development and course of cognitive CI—particularly modifiable factors related to environment and lifestyle-- is currently an area of increasing interest, due to the potential for preventive strategies. Candidate modifiable factors to build or maintain brain reserve include physical exercise, mentally active lifestyles (cognitive reserve), management of cardiovascular risk factors and other comorbidities, psychiatric disorders, fatigue, pain and sleep abnormalities. Among environmental and lifestyle factors, the role of smoking, cannabis use and alcohol has been recently assessed. Future research should strive to understand mechanisms of action of documented risk factors and protective factors in MS and assess possible interactions between different environmental factors as well as between environmental and genetic factors.
Disclosure: Maria Pia Amato received research grants and honoraria as a speaker and member of advisory boards by: Bayer, Biogen, Merck, Novartis, Sanofi Genzyme, Teva, Almirall, Celgene and Roche

Abstract: 136

Type: Educational Session

Abstract Category: Educational Session 16 (IMSCOGS): Cognitive dysfunction in MS

M.P. Amato

NEUROFARBA, University of Florence, Florence, Italy

The subtle and often insidious changes in cognition observed in multiple sclerosis (MS), unspoken of for years, are finally being given the profile and importance their impact warrants. Cognitive impairment (CI) has been reported in 30% to >65% of clinically-based studies, depending on the criterion used for definition. It has been described in all the disease stages and phenotypes, including clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS), so called 'benign MS' and pediatric-onset MS. The neuropsychological profile is mainly represented by defects in information processing speed, verbal and visuo-spatial memory and executive functions; linguistic deficits have also been detected in the pediatric group. Overall, the prevalence and severity of CI appears to be prominent in secondary and primary progressive MS patients. While controlled studies are lacking, there is consistent evidence that cognition tends to decline in patients over the long-term (10-20 years). The study of risk or protecting factors that may influence the development and course of cognitive CI—particularly modifiable factors related to environment and lifestyle-- is currently an area of increasing interest, due to the potential for preventive strategies. Candidate modifiable factors to build or maintain brain reserve include physical exercise, mentally active lifestyles (cognitive reserve), management of cardiovascular risk factors and other comorbidities, psychiatric disorders, fatigue, pain and sleep abnormalities. Among environmental and lifestyle factors, the role of smoking, cannabis use and alcohol has been recently assessed. Future research should strive to understand mechanisms of action of documented risk factors and protective factors in MS and assess possible interactions between different environmental factors as well as between environmental and genetic factors.
Disclosure: Maria Pia Amato received research grants and honoraria as a speaker and member of advisory boards by: Bayer, Biogen, Merck, Novartis, Sanofi Genzyme, Teva, Almirall, Celgene and Roche

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies