Excess mortality of people suffering from multiple sclerosis in Germany
ECTRIMS Online Library. Albrecht P. 09/13/19; 279538; 275
Philipp Albrecht
Philipp Albrecht
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: 275

Type: Scientific Session

Abstract Category: Clinical aspects of MS - Epidemiology

A. Willmann1, T. Tönnies2, H.-P. Hartung3, A. Hoyer2, R. Brinks1,2, P. Albrecht3

1Hiller Research Unit for Rheumatology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, 2Institute for Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Centre (DDZ), Heinrich Heine University, Düsseldorf, 3Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Medical Faculty Heinrich-Heine-University, Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany

Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) leads to chronic disability and can severely impact patient lives. Previous studies from countries with a comparable healthcare system to Germany have reported a shortened lifespan and a higher mortality risk for patients with MS compared to the general population.
So far there is no similar analysis for Germany.
Aim: Aim of our project was to describe the age- and gender specific excess mortality of MS-patients at the aged 50 to 95 years.
Methods: We used previously published data of 70 million statutory health insured people in Germany from 2009 to 2015. We used the illness-death model to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) comparing mortality of people with MS to people without MS. The analysis was based on the aggregated age- and gender specific prevalence- and incidence data.
Results: Women and men with MS had an elevated HR at a younger age, which decreases with age.
The HR for women between 50 and 54 years was 6,97 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5,98 -7,96) and it decreased to 1,21 (95% CI: 1,18-1,24) at the age between 90 and 94 years.
For men between 50 and 54 years the HR was 5,88 (95% CI: 5,50-6,35) and it decreased to 1,57 (95% CI:1,55-1,60) at the age between 90 and 94 years.
Conclusions: In Germany, women and men with MS have a higher mortality compared to people without MS. MS-patients experience an up to seven times higher mortality at younger age. Overall the mortality of MS patients decreases with increasing age.
Our results confirm previous results from other studies in countries with a similar standard of living and comparable healthcare systems.
Disclosure: Alexandra Willmann: nothing to disclose
Thaddäus Tönnies : nothing to disclose
Hans-Peter Hartung : nothing to disclose
Annika Hoyer : nothing to disclose
Ralph Brinks : nothing to disclose
Philipp Albrecht: reports grants, personal fees and non-financial support from Allergan, Biogen, Ipsen, Merz Pharmaceuticals, Novartis, and Roche, personal fees and non-financial support from Bayer Healthcare, and Merck, and non-financial support from Sanofi-Aventis/Genzyme

Abstract: 275

Type: Scientific Session

Abstract Category: Clinical aspects of MS - Epidemiology

A. Willmann1, T. Tönnies2, H.-P. Hartung3, A. Hoyer2, R. Brinks1,2, P. Albrecht3

1Hiller Research Unit for Rheumatology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, 2Institute for Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Centre (DDZ), Heinrich Heine University, Düsseldorf, 3Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Medical Faculty Heinrich-Heine-University, Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany

Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) leads to chronic disability and can severely impact patient lives. Previous studies from countries with a comparable healthcare system to Germany have reported a shortened lifespan and a higher mortality risk for patients with MS compared to the general population.
So far there is no similar analysis for Germany.
Aim: Aim of our project was to describe the age- and gender specific excess mortality of MS-patients at the aged 50 to 95 years.
Methods: We used previously published data of 70 million statutory health insured people in Germany from 2009 to 2015. We used the illness-death model to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) comparing mortality of people with MS to people without MS. The analysis was based on the aggregated age- and gender specific prevalence- and incidence data.
Results: Women and men with MS had an elevated HR at a younger age, which decreases with age.
The HR for women between 50 and 54 years was 6,97 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5,98 -7,96) and it decreased to 1,21 (95% CI: 1,18-1,24) at the age between 90 and 94 years.
For men between 50 and 54 years the HR was 5,88 (95% CI: 5,50-6,35) and it decreased to 1,57 (95% CI:1,55-1,60) at the age between 90 and 94 years.
Conclusions: In Germany, women and men with MS have a higher mortality compared to people without MS. MS-patients experience an up to seven times higher mortality at younger age. Overall the mortality of MS patients decreases with increasing age.
Our results confirm previous results from other studies in countries with a similar standard of living and comparable healthcare systems.
Disclosure: Alexandra Willmann: nothing to disclose
Thaddäus Tönnies : nothing to disclose
Hans-Peter Hartung : nothing to disclose
Annika Hoyer : nothing to disclose
Ralph Brinks : nothing to disclose
Philipp Albrecht: reports grants, personal fees and non-financial support from Allergan, Biogen, Ipsen, Merz Pharmaceuticals, Novartis, and Roche, personal fees and non-financial support from Bayer Healthcare, and Merck, and non-financial support from Sanofi-Aventis/Genzyme

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