Perceived fatigue is a barrier to physical activity participation in people with multiple sclerosis and minimal disability
ECTRIMS Online Library. Frid L. 09/13/19; 279574; 317
Lior Frid
Lior Frid
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: 317

Type: Scientific Session

Abstract Category: RIMS - Symptoms Management (including cognition, fatigue, imbalance)

L. Frid1, A. Kalron2, H. Baransi1, D. Magalashvili1, A. Achiron1,3

1Multiple Sclerosis Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, 2Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, 3Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel

Background: There is a consensus that physical activity is imperative for people with MS (PwMS). Regardless of the benefits, many PwMS do not indulge in any meaningful physical activity.
Aims: To clarify the relationship between energy expenditure while walking, leisure-time physical activity and perceived fatigue in PwMS.
Methods: We enrolled patients between 18- 60 years, EDSS ≤4.0, able to walk at least 500m without aid; relapse-free for at least 90 days; and willing and able to wear an oxygen analyzer while walking. Energy expenditure was measured at rest, during comfortable walking and during fast walking via a portable metabolic device using breath-by-breath technology (COSMED K5, COSMED Srl, Rome, Italy). The Godin leisure-time exercise questionnaire (GLTEQ) assessed leisure-time physical activity. Accordingly patients were divided into physically active (GLTEQ score ≥24) and insufficiently active (GLTEQ score < 24) groups. The Modified Fatigue Impact Scale determined the level of perceived fatigue.
Results: Sixty-six PwMS, 32 females, age 39.5±10.8 with mild neurological disability (median EDSS=2.0), participated in the study. Seventeen PwMS were classified as physically active (GLTEQ=47.8±18.4); 49 were insufficiently active (GLTEQ=7.0±8.2). No differences were found between groups in terms of age, height, weight, gender and EDSS. Insufficiently physically active PwMS walked slower at both normal and fast walking conditions. Normal walking speed (m/min) was 71.5±16.2 and 60.6±12.0 in the active and insufficiently active group, respectively. No differences between groups were observed in energy expenditure measures in both walking speeds; O2 cost was 0.20±0.13 and 0.21±0.06 in the active and insufficiently active group, respectively. The insufficiently active group reported more perceived fatigue compared with the active patients; 33.3±18.6 vs. 15.0±19.0, p =0.002. Based on the linear regression analysis, perceived fatigue explained 10.4% of leisure-time physical activity in the total sample.
Conclusions: Perceived fatigue is a barrier to physical activity participation even in PwMS with mild disability. Insufficiently active PwMS expend the same amount of energy while walking as active patients, though walking slower. Rehabilitation professionals need to be aware of these relationships when planning rehabilitation strategies.
Disclosure: All authors have nothing to declare

Abstract: 317

Type: Scientific Session

Abstract Category: RIMS - Symptoms Management (including cognition, fatigue, imbalance)

L. Frid1, A. Kalron2, H. Baransi1, D. Magalashvili1, A. Achiron1,3

1Multiple Sclerosis Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, 2Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, 3Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel

Background: There is a consensus that physical activity is imperative for people with MS (PwMS). Regardless of the benefits, many PwMS do not indulge in any meaningful physical activity.
Aims: To clarify the relationship between energy expenditure while walking, leisure-time physical activity and perceived fatigue in PwMS.
Methods: We enrolled patients between 18- 60 years, EDSS ≤4.0, able to walk at least 500m without aid; relapse-free for at least 90 days; and willing and able to wear an oxygen analyzer while walking. Energy expenditure was measured at rest, during comfortable walking and during fast walking via a portable metabolic device using breath-by-breath technology (COSMED K5, COSMED Srl, Rome, Italy). The Godin leisure-time exercise questionnaire (GLTEQ) assessed leisure-time physical activity. Accordingly patients were divided into physically active (GLTEQ score ≥24) and insufficiently active (GLTEQ score < 24) groups. The Modified Fatigue Impact Scale determined the level of perceived fatigue.
Results: Sixty-six PwMS, 32 females, age 39.5±10.8 with mild neurological disability (median EDSS=2.0), participated in the study. Seventeen PwMS were classified as physically active (GLTEQ=47.8±18.4); 49 were insufficiently active (GLTEQ=7.0±8.2). No differences were found between groups in terms of age, height, weight, gender and EDSS. Insufficiently physically active PwMS walked slower at both normal and fast walking conditions. Normal walking speed (m/min) was 71.5±16.2 and 60.6±12.0 in the active and insufficiently active group, respectively. No differences between groups were observed in energy expenditure measures in both walking speeds; O2 cost was 0.20±0.13 and 0.21±0.06 in the active and insufficiently active group, respectively. The insufficiently active group reported more perceived fatigue compared with the active patients; 33.3±18.6 vs. 15.0±19.0, p =0.002. Based on the linear regression analysis, perceived fatigue explained 10.4% of leisure-time physical activity in the total sample.
Conclusions: Perceived fatigue is a barrier to physical activity participation even in PwMS with mild disability. Insufficiently active PwMS expend the same amount of energy while walking as active patients, though walking slower. Rehabilitation professionals need to be aware of these relationships when planning rehabilitation strategies.
Disclosure: All authors have nothing to declare

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