Psychosocial explanatory factors of balance confidence in persons with multiple sclerosis
ECTRIMS Online Library. Abasıyanık Z. 09/13/19; 279576; 319
Zuhal Abasıyanık
Zuhal Abasıyanık
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: 319

Type: Scientific Session

Abstract Category: RIMS - Symptoms Management (including cognition, fatigue, imbalance)

Z. Abasıyanık1, A.T. Özdoğar2, Ö. Sagici2, Ö. Ertekin3, S. Özakbaş4, Multiple Sclerosis Research Group

1Graduate School of Health Sciences, Dokuz Eylul University, 2Graduate School of Health Sciences, 3School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Dokuz Eylül University, 4Department of Neurology, Dokuz Eylül University Faculty of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey

Background: The performance of balance-demanding activities includes a psychological component.
High level of balance confidence may lead to the achievement of the activity independent of physical ability. Assessing balance confidence and determine related factors are important factors in fall risk assessment.
Aim: The aim was to investigate the relationship between balance confidence and psychosocial factors in persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS).
Methods: A total of 472 pwMS were enrolled in the study (mean age=38.18±11.7) Balance confidence was assessed with the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale. Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) was used the evaluate fatigue. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and the Beck Depression Scale were used to determine sleepiness and depression. Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ) was used to assess physical activity levels. Cognitive functions were evaluated using the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT). An exploratory data analysis was performed to examine the influence of the psychosocial factors on balance confidence, using linear regression analyses.
Results: There was a significant correlation between the ABC score and MFIS, BDI, and SDMT (r=-0.536, r=-0.373, r=0.513, p< 0.001; respectively). Small correlation was found between ABC test and GLTEQ and ESS (r=0.173, p< 0< 001; r=-0.134, p=0.002; respectively). The stepwise regression analysis showed that SDMT and BDI explained 42.5% of the variance of the ABC test.
Conclusion: Our study showed that beyond the physical functions, cognition and depression are important factors on balance confidence in pwMS. Understanding these relationships can potentially improve management of balance confidence and fall risk.
Disclosure: Zuhal Abasıyanık: nothing to disclose
Asiye Tuba Özdoğar:nothing to disclose
Özge Sağıcı: nothing to disclose
Özge Ertekin: nothing to disclose
Serkan Özakbaş: nothing to disclose

Abstract: 319

Type: Scientific Session

Abstract Category: RIMS - Symptoms Management (including cognition, fatigue, imbalance)

Z. Abasıyanık1, A.T. Özdoğar2, Ö. Sagici2, Ö. Ertekin3, S. Özakbaş4, Multiple Sclerosis Research Group

1Graduate School of Health Sciences, Dokuz Eylul University, 2Graduate School of Health Sciences, 3School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Dokuz Eylül University, 4Department of Neurology, Dokuz Eylül University Faculty of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey

Background: The performance of balance-demanding activities includes a psychological component.
High level of balance confidence may lead to the achievement of the activity independent of physical ability. Assessing balance confidence and determine related factors are important factors in fall risk assessment.
Aim: The aim was to investigate the relationship between balance confidence and psychosocial factors in persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS).
Methods: A total of 472 pwMS were enrolled in the study (mean age=38.18±11.7) Balance confidence was assessed with the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale. Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) was used the evaluate fatigue. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and the Beck Depression Scale were used to determine sleepiness and depression. Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ) was used to assess physical activity levels. Cognitive functions were evaluated using the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT). An exploratory data analysis was performed to examine the influence of the psychosocial factors on balance confidence, using linear regression analyses.
Results: There was a significant correlation between the ABC score and MFIS, BDI, and SDMT (r=-0.536, r=-0.373, r=0.513, p< 0.001; respectively). Small correlation was found between ABC test and GLTEQ and ESS (r=0.173, p< 0< 001; r=-0.134, p=0.002; respectively). The stepwise regression analysis showed that SDMT and BDI explained 42.5% of the variance of the ABC test.
Conclusion: Our study showed that beyond the physical functions, cognition and depression are important factors on balance confidence in pwMS. Understanding these relationships can potentially improve management of balance confidence and fall risk.
Disclosure: Zuhal Abasıyanık: nothing to disclose
Asiye Tuba Özdoğar:nothing to disclose
Özge Sağıcı: nothing to disclose
Özge Ertekin: nothing to disclose
Serkan Özakbaş: nothing to disclose

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